STUDENTS

Statutory

Statutory2018-09-25T10:07:33+00:00

Art
Key Stage 3
At Key Stage 3 students study Art through the delivery of 6 mini GCSE style projects. The projects provide a rich variety of practically based learning opportunities that build knowledge and understanding and give students the time to explore and refine their skills in preparation for Key Stage 4. Students are exposed to a broad range of materials and techniques, but are always encouraged to experiment and develop their own learning journeys.

Year 7 projects
Formal Element – An introduction to five of the formal elements of art, including line, shape, mark making, colour and pattern. Students explore these elements through experimentation and links to artists such as Vincent Van Gogh, M.C Esher, Andre Derain and Bridget Riley. The formal elements are the bases of all pieces of artwork.
Natural Forms Printmaking – An explorative project focusing on recording, developing and refining. Students develop their own still life set up using natural forms in the style of given artists. Students then photograph these and develop their initial photographs through ICT, mono printings and collograph printing.
3D Sea Creatures – A 3D design and make project where students look at the illustrative drawings of scientist and artist Ernst Heckle and develop their initial studies into 3D sea creatures.  Students are encouraged to independently explore a range of materials to manipulate and model into a 3D sculpture.

Year 8 projects
Art of Sport – A graphic type project focusing on movement in art and recording through cut work.  Students look at the work of the Futurist group and develop their own sports theme pieces in the style of Henri Matisse and the Olympic Athlete and Artist Roald Bradstock.  This project has been developed to link to the school’s sports specialism status.
Abstract Art – An experimental project focusing on art and emotions. Students look at how artists have used art to show their thoughts and feelings. Students look at what abstract art means to them and how they can use codes and conventions to ‘read’ a painting. Students explore painting to music in the style of Kandinsky as well as the action paintings of Jackson Pollock. The project culminates with a 3D sculpture inspired by Frank Stella.
Cubist Masks – A 3D clay project focusing on the cubist portrait work of Pablo Picasso. Students look at Picasso’s African influences and explore these patterns and shapes through clay in the form of a tile.  Students then develop these initial experimentations into a Cubist style clay mask.

Key Stage 4
Year 9
In Year 9 students have the opportunity to further develop and secure their Art and Design skills and knowledge.  They are shown how to accurately record from observation and develop initial ideas into their own individual and personal outcomes.  Students continue to build on the skills and techniques used at Key Stage 3 with the introduction of new advanced techniques such collograph printing and 3D card modeling. Students are guided and nurtured to ultimately have the confidence to discover their own unique skills and talents and excel in their final assessments and exam pieces.
Celebrity – This project has a heavy focus on drawing and recording. Students are taught how to grid up a drawing and copy it accurately. Students look at a range of Pop Artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Hattie Stewart. Students learn how to work in the style of an artist without copying their work. They learn to successfully develop their initial ideas into a final piece.
Masks – This extended project is designed to replicate that of a GCSE project. Students are given 3 starting points African, Sci-fi and Masquerade. They are taught how to record, develop, refine and present their work to meet GCSE criteria and expectations. Students are encouraged to continue to practice and explore drawing techniques.

Year 10 and Year 11
We currently offer AQA GCSE Fine Art (course code 8202).  On starting Year 10 students are well accustomed to independent working and know where their artistic strengths lie. In Year 10 and 11 students need to complete work for their coursework portfolio. This usually consists of a mini project and a major more sustained project that counts as 60% of the final grade.
Project 1 – We encourage students to focus on their drawing skills as this is valued and highly rewarded on the exam board assessment criteria.
Project 2 – This project is developed through Year 10 and into Year 11.  Students are encouraged to create a highly personal and independent body of work as a culmination of everything they have been taught in the previous 4 years.
Externally set task and 10 hour exam (40% of total marks) – The course concludes with a practical exam project which is set by the exam board. Students are supported in lessons to produce their initial observations, developments and refinements. All of which are submitted for final assessment along with the final outcome produced in the unaided 10 hour exam.
Each year we organise an Art exhibition for our Year 11 GCSE students to celebrate their hard work, commitment and show case their successes.

Extra-curricular Art
Art Clubs are available at lunchtime and after school for Key Stages 3 & 4. We are currently running an Art Master class for our most able students where they have the opportunity to study some of the Art Greats. During these sessions students are working on canvas with oil paints.

Dance
Key Stage 3
Dance focuses on the promotion of physical education and the benefits it can have for a student’s health and wellbeing. Students start to develop a range of skills including co-ordination, stamina and confidence. They create and learn a range of choreography in different dance styles using techniques taught in class.

Key Stage 4
Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award: Performing Arts.

Extra-curricular Dance
Includes Street Dance and Contemporary Music

Drama
Key Stage 3
Drama at Key Stage 3 focuses on the promotion of communication and confidence skills. Using practical and creative tasks individually and collaboratively our students are supported to develop into confident and independent individuals.
Students start to develop a range of skills including discussion work, evaluation, performing and creating using a variety of styles and genres and learning from practitioners.

Key Stage 4
Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award: Performing Arts.

Extra-curricular Drama
Underachievers and Catch-up support club
Choir and Musical Theatre
Key Stage 3 Drama Club

Music
Key Stage 3
Year 7
Students learn the basics of music staff notation by learning simple tunes on the electronic keyboard and on a wind instrument taught in ensemble lessons. Students use music technology to learn to compose and understand the elements of music. Students learn ensemble and solo performance skills in wind band lessons. In ensemble lessons using African instruments they discover more about African rhythms and melodies and how to improvise.

Year 8
Students learn about Indian music notation and how to compose their own Indian music using a Raga. They learn Bhangra melodies and rhythms as well as a Bollywood melody. They use music technology to remix these to create their own composition in an Indian genre.
In Year 8 ensemble lessons students use electronic keyboards and pitched percussion to learn about Blues Music, they explore how Pop music developed from Blues through other styles and genres to what it is today. They learn to compose in the Blues style putting together rhythms, chords, riffs and bass lines.

Key Stage 4
Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Music
Students’ study:
Unit 1 – The music industry
Unit 2 – Managing a music product
Unit 4 – Introducing composing
Unit 5 – Introducing performing
This course prepares students for further study in Music and is a foundation for ‘A’ Level Music and vocational courses

The Music Department offers an extensive extra-curricular timetable of instrumental lessons and ensemble groups. Students also have the opportunity to take Grade exams in musical instruments and in Music Theory.

Parents/Carers may find the following links helpful:
Leicester-Shire Music Education Hub
My Panyard
D-E-A Classes and Tuition
Crown Hills Records at https://store.cdbaby.com/Artist/VariousArtists3732

Please find below links to music from our Steel Bands

Please find below links to music from our Steel Bands 

Merry Christmas 

Footsteps 

The Lion Sleeps Tonight 

Soul Limbo 

Just the way you are 

Little Mermaid 

Stand By Me 

Yellow Submarine 

In MFL we aspire to use the Target Language in every day college life, and to develop a knowledge of language to be used outside school: on holiday, in a future work situation for example. We are committed to learn all key and topic specific vocabulary as well as all grammar points and tenses. We are also committed be curious and to learn about the culture and customs of the people who live in French speaking countries. We are successful when we build on previous knowledge in order to achieve the higher grade we are capable of.

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
Vocabulary
  • Hobbies
  • Home
  • School and clothes
  • Daily routine
  • French speaking countries
  • Me & my family
  • Health
  • Media
  • Holiday
  • Customs
  • Free time
  • Home
  • School
  • Technology
  • Travel
  • Festivals
  • Technology
  • Global issues
  • Social issues
  • Post-16
  • Identity and Culture
  • Local, national and Global areas of interest
  • Study and Employment
Grammar
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Clauses
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Negative
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Object pronouns
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Object pronouns
  • Complex structures
Tenses
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Future tense
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Future tense
  • Conditional
  • Present tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Subjunctive
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Future tense
  • Conditional
  • Subjunctive
Skills
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing

RELIGIOUS STUDIES CURRICULUM
Year 7 – Students will explore sources of wisdom and authority within a broad range of religions and will consider how these teachings and beliefs influence followers. Two Religious Studies topics are studied across the year.  These are:

  •      Founders and Creation Stories – A study of founders, key figures and creation stories.
  •      Pilgrimages and celebrations – A study of key places of pilgrimage and the key celebrations.

Year 8 –  Students will explore sources of wisdom and authority within a broad range of religions and will consider how these teachings and beliefs influence followers. Two Religious Studies topics are studied across the year.  These are:

  • Holy books and Moral codes – A study into holy books and moral codes with an investigation into medical ethics
  • Worship, beliefs and practices – this acts as an introduction to GCSE Religious Studies.

KS4 – WJEC Eduqas GCSE in Religious Studies

COMPONENT 1

  •  Issues of Relationships
  • Issues of life and death
  • Issues of Good and Evil
  • Issues of Human Rights

COMPONENT 2:

  • Christian Beliefs and Teachings
  •  Christianity Practices

COMPNENT 3:

  • Islam Beliefs & Teaching
  • Islam Practices
Computer Science

This carefully planned course gives students a real in-depth understanding of how computer technology works.
It offers an insight into what goes on ‘behind the scenes’, including computer programming.
For suitable KS4 Computing students they will learn to do the following:
• Develop their understanding of current and emerging technologies and how they work.
• Look at the use of algorithms in computer programs
• Become independent and discerning users of IT
• Acquire and apply creative and technical skills, knowledge and understanding of Computing in a range of contexts
• Develop computer programs to solve problems
• Evaluate the effectiveness of computer programs/solutions and impact of computer technology in society

Assessment:
You will have the potential to gain a GCSE Computing Science qualification graded 1-9; with exam and range of topics supplied by OCR. This is an Ebaccalaureate subject option. The course is assessed by a written paper, which has a mixture of short and long answer questions, some of which require students to write program code. This course is 100% assessed by external examination.
Click here for Information about OCR GCSE Computing Qualification

Crown Hills Community College IT & Computing Overview

The IT & Computing department presently has three dedicated rooms, each well equipped with PCs and an electronic white board for teaching purposes. A further room is to be built as part of the expansion of the college.
The college has a range of technology in each zone including Laptops, and iPads that can be hired out by each faculty.

Curriculum & Modes of Study Overview

Our vibrant and forward thinking Computing department teach the following modes of study to students in Key Stage 3:
Students in Years 7-8 have one discrete Computing lesson per week.
They are taught in mixed ability groups.
Schemes of work follow the National Curriculum and are constantly reviewed and updated to meet the ever changing needs of our students and governmental changes.
At key points in the curriculum students are assessed to reinforce their learning.
In Year 9 students are currently taught toward their KS4 GCSE, fine tuning skills taught through year7 and 8 with new emphasis on Computing Science, programming and computational thinking.

Key Stage 3 students will be able to:
• Collaborate on projects
• Use skills that combine multiple software applications across a range of devices
• Collect and analyse data and information to meet the needs of a given target audience
• Create, reuse and repurpose digital information and content
• Understand and plan for copyright and intellectual property laws
• Use two programming languages
• Understand hardware and software components
• Explain network topologies
• Understand how to stay eSafe and advise others how to do the same
• Understand maths for Computing – binary
• Use control systems to model systems i.e. traffic lights

Key Stage 4 students

All our students will have the opportunity to take qualifications in aspects of GCSE Computing or Creative iMedia, which lead to progression for higher levels of study at college, or within a professional career.

ROUTES FOR PROGRESSION:

Students wishing to continue in this subject will be able to progress to A Level ICT. Students who do not wish to study ICT further will be able to use their ICT skills to assist other A Level subjects. Students wishing to go to College will be able to use their ICT skills to assist whichever course they pursue; Students going into Apprenticeships will clearly be able to show employers and trainers the level of their ICT competence using a recognised qualification, especially in the areas covered by the units outlined below.

Creative iMedia GCSE
Creative iMedia
If you like creating things on the computer, then Creative iMedia is the course you might choose.
It has 4 units, 3 of them are based on your coursework in making and changing images using Photoshop, making webpages and making games using Game Maker. One unit has a written exam to do, which is done in January of Year 10, but may be retaken if needed. All the 4 units are worth 25% of the overall grade each.
By taking this option you will be taking a Level 2 VCF course (not a BTEC) from OCR.
You will have the potential to gain GCSE grades 1 – 9 on successful completion of the course. A sample of typical units is listed below with explanation of the skillset assessed on the unit.

R081: Pre-production skills.  This is a compulsory unit, based on all aspects of planning projects from Mood boards to Gantt Charts. It will also develop their understanding of the client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques that form part of the planning and creation process. For the assessment of this unit, the students will be entered for an exam, which may be retaken if needed.
R082: Creating digital graphics.  This is also a compulsory unit, in which Photoshop is used to edit photographs and images to suit given situations. For the assessment of this unit, students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.
R085: Creating a multiple website. In this unit, Students will have the opportunity to understand the basics of creating multiple websites through this unit. They will also be able to demonstrate their creativity by combining components to create a functional, intuitive and aesthetically pleasing website using Dreamweaver or Web Plus. For the assessment of this unit students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.
R092: Developing digital games. Through this unit, students will examine the basics of creating digital games and their environments for the creative and digital media sector. They will also develop the know-how to create a playable game from an existing design or brief. For the assessment of this unit, students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.

Click here for Information about OCR iMedia GCSE Qualification

Here at Crown Hills, we are committed to encouraging all our pupils to read widely for pleasure. Literacy skills underpin all aspects of academic learning and education and there is no refuting the evidence that a reading child is a successful child.

A number of initiatives are currently in place at Crown Hills to support, encourage and develop the reading skills of all of our pupils. We ensure that every child in the school has fifteen minutes of dedicated literacy development time for four mornings each week, adding up to an hour each week.

All our pupils are tested to establish their reading levels, and a number of interventions are in place to develop pupils’ confidence and skills. One of these initiatives is the VIP (the Vocabulary Improvement Programme), a 12 lesson unit of work designed to develop the vocabulary, reading and writing skills of pupils falling about 2 years below their actual age in terms of reading comprehension. 52 pupils in years 7 and 8 have completed the programme so far, and of these, 40 have shown a significant improvement in their reading, with an average increase of 2 years in the space of a few weeks. This is a 77% success rate and we plan to continue and expand the programme in the future.

All pupils are issued with their reading ages and our library is extremely well stocked with books tailored to all reading abilities; pupils are able to find books appropriately challenging but accessible for their age and ability. To support this, our Librarian has painstakingly taken the time to ensure all books are labelled with reading age needed for the content. Many of our more able readers become Leaders of Literacy and support their peers with reading and other literacy development strategies. Likewise, all teaching staff have access to the reading ages of pupils in their classes and tailor their lessons and reading materials to match the needs of the children.

A recent reading survey, conducted by a third party, has provided some very encouraging results in regard to our pupils’ attitude towards reading for pleasure. These include:

o The percentage of pupils liking the books Crown Hills has to offer continues to rise.

o At Crown Hills a higher percentage of boys than girls want to become a better reader.

o 76% of pupils felt that regular readers are people “who want to do well”.

o 85% of pupils who completed the survey said they enjoy reading.

o 85% of our pupils who completed the reading survey, read at home for pleasure at least once per week.

o 24% of pupils read for pleasure at home every day.

A number of students at Crown Hills College have difficulties with reading. Some students have learning difficulties and others are new to English. We strive to identify students, through one to one assessments, for additional support to develop their reading. Once identified, we use appropriate interventions. We deliver Read Write Inc. Fresh Start to students with limited reading skills. This is a phonic based intervention which aims to secure phonic knowledge and decoding. For students at the next level, we deliver Rapid Plus during morning literacy time. This aims to boost reading comprehension, and students have made great leaps in their reading through this.

There are a number of students at Crown Hills who are new to English and are supported by the EAL department. The EAL staff support reading through reading groups during literacy time. These groups focus on building vocabulary and high frequency words. They use the Oxford Reading Tree for the new arrivals. For the students who have been in the country for a longer period of time, the EAL staff also use Rapid Plus. Last year, some EAL students from Year 11 were used as group leaders to support Year 8 EAL students with their reading. This was successful and so the same is planned for this academic year. During morning literacy time, we also deliver Lexia, an online literacy intervention, to larger groups of students. The results from our trial of Lexia were fantastic in giving a boost to reading and spelling skills. For some students, reading comprehension and ‘reading between the lines’ are more of a challenge. For these students we can deliver Inference Training in small groups.

YEAR 7 CATCH-UP GRANT FOR 2014/2015
Details Income Expenditure
Year 7 Catch Up Grant 2014/15  33,500.00
Resources 84.45
Tutor 7,900.00
Tutor 7,806.11
Total 33,500.00 15,709.56
Balance 17,709.44

Balance of £17,709.44 will cover Tutors Salary for this academic year (2015/16) as we have not been notified if funding is to continue.

English At Crown Hills Community College
Year 7 & 8

English Language & Literature

Students will engage with poetry, plays, novels and a variety of non-fiction texts.

Students will write creatively and respond critically to texts.

Speaking & Listening activities will take place throughout the years.

Students will undertake two author studies a year.

Students will complete reading and writing assessments which mirror the questions they will be asked in their AQA examinations in Y11.

Students will sit two exam papers which mirror exactly what they will face in their exams in Y11.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

Year 9

English Literature GCSE (Year 1)

Students will begin their GCSE English Literature course in preparation for their examination at the end of Y10 if they are ready, Year 11 if they are not.

Students will write creatively and respond critically to texts.

Speaking & Listening activities will take place throughout the year.

Students will study texts which will prepare them for their exam texts.

Students will complete reading and writing assessments which mirror the questions they will be asked in their AQA examinations in Y10/11.

Students will sit two exam papers which mirror exactly what they will face in their exams in Y10/Y11.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

Year 10 & 11

English Language and English Literature GCSE

Students study the AQA exam board.

They will study for two separate GCSEs.

Each exam is 100% final exam; there is no longer any coursework or controlled assessments.

There is now only one tier of entry. Every student attempts the same exam paper.

Grades will be given from 1-9.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

English Language

Students must complete one Spoken Language assessment that is recorded but does not contribute to the overall grade.

Paper One is fiction based and lasts 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Students will answer 4 questions in response to a fiction extract.

Students will complete one written response – either a piece of description or a narrative.

Paper Two is non-fiction based and lasts 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Students will answer 4 questions in response to two non-fiction extracts.

Students will complete one written response – either a letter, article, leaflet, essay or speech.

English Literature

Paper One asks students to respond to a Shakespeare play and a pre-20th century novel and lasts for 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Paper Two asks students to respond to a modern text, two studied poems and two unseen poems and lasts for 2 hours and 15 minutes.

Texts that may be studied include

‘Macbeth’

‘Romeo & Juliet’

‘Much Ado About Nothing’

‘A Christmas Carol’

‘An Inspector Calls’

‘Animal Farm’

‘The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time’

A Poetry Anthology

USEFUL INFORMATION

ARI Cycle 2017 including dates
Foundation revision checklist
Foundation revision schedule
Higher revision checklist
Higher Revision Schedule
Maths Price List
Exam Dates for GCSE Mathematics 2017-18
KEY STAGE 3
The exact content and depth in which each of these topics will be covered will be dependent on whether your child is following the support, core or able scheme of work.
Year 7

Topics

Induction activities

Using Numbers

Sequences

Perimeter and Area

Decimal Numbers

Working with Numbers

Statistics

Algebra

Fractions

Angles

Coordinates and Graphs

Percentages

Probability

Symmetry

Equations

Interpreting Data

3D shapes

Ratio

Year 8

Topics

Working with Numbers

Geometry

Geometry/ Assess

Probability

Percentages

Sequences

Area of 2D & 3D shapes

Graphs

Simplifying Numbers

Interpreting Data

Algebra

Congruence and scaling

Fractions and Decimals

Proportion

Circles

Equations and Formulae

Comparing Data

STEM Project

Recommended support resources for Years 7 and 8 are Collins Connect and My Maths
GCSE Mathematics
The depth to which your child will cover each topic may vary depending on their ability group and rate of progress.
Year 9 Higher

Topics

Basic Number

Fractions, Ratio and Proportion

Statistical Diagrams

Number Sequences

Ratio and Proportion

Angles

Transformations

Algebraic Manipulation

Length, Area and Volume

Linear Graphs

Right-angles Triangles

End of Year Assessmen

Year 9 Foundation

Topics

Basic Number

Measures and Scale Drawing

Charts, tables, Averages

Angles

Number Properties

Approximations

Decimals and Fractions

Linear Graphs

Expressions and Formulae

Ratio, Speed and Proportion

End of year assessment

Year 10 Higher

Topics

Similarity

Exploring and Applying Probability

Powers and Standard Form

Equations and Inequalities

Accuracy and Surds

Quadratic Equations

End of Year Assessment

Year 10 Foundation

Topics

Perimeter and Area

Transformations

Probability and Events

Volumes, Surface Area

Linear Equations

Percentages and Compound Measures

Percentages and Variation

Statistics

Construction and Loci

End of Year Assessment

Year 11 Higher

Topics

Sampling and More Complex Diagrams

Combined Events

Properties of Circles

Variation

Triangles

Graphs

Algebraic Fractions and Functions

Vector Geometry

Revision

Final Examination

Year 11 Foundation

Topics

Curved shapes and Pyramids

Number and Sequences

Right-angled Triangles

Congruency and Similarity

Probability: Combined Events

Powers and Standard Form

Simultaneous Equations

Linear Inequalities

Non-linear Graphs

Revision

Final Examination

Recommended support resources for Years 9 to 11 are Collins Connect and My Maths and Maths Watch CD
KS4 Qualifications

AQA GCSE Mathematics Linear (8300)

Students who require extra

support may be offered

OCR Entry Level Mathematics (R449)

Crown Hills Community College ICT and Computing Modes of Study

The ICT department has three dedicated rooms, each well equipped with PCs and an electronic white board for teaching purposes.

The college has a range of technology in each zone including Laptops, and iPads that can be hired out by each faculty.

Curriculum

Our vibrant and forward thinking ICT department teach the following modes of study to students in Key Stage 3:

Students in Years 7-9 have one discrete ICT lesson per week.

They are taught in mixed ability groups.

Schemes of work follow the National Curriculum and are constantly reviewed and updated to meet the ever changing needs of our students and governmental changes.

At the end of each unit students are assessed to reinforce their learning.

Students are encouraged to familiarise themselves with the level criteria for each unit in order to get the best possible grades.

In Year 9 students are taught towards a Functional Skills qualification and then examined at the appropriate time for their level.

Key Stage 3 students will be able to:

• Collaborate on projects

• Use skills that combine multiple software applications across a range of devices

• Collect and analyse data and information to meet the needs of a given target audience

• Create, reuse and repurpose digital information and content

• Understand and plan for copyright and intellectual property laws

• Use two programming languages

• Understand hardware and software components

• Explain network topologies

• Understand how to stay eSafe and advise others how to do the same

• Understand maths for computing – binary

• Use control systems to model systems i.e. traffic lights

Key Stage 4 students

All our students will have the opportunity to take qualifications in aspects of GCSE ICT or Computer Science, which lead to progression for higher levels of study at college, or within a professional career.

Students will develop their capability, creativity, and knowledge in digital media, information technology, and computer science, manage their online identity by staying eSafe and participate in online communities such as Office 365 and Sky Drive where they can collaborate on shared documents and projects.

They will develop and critically evaluate digital media, and take account of ethical, legal, social, and environmental consequences of information systems and their effects on society.

By studying computing sciences students will further develop and apply their analytic, problem-solving, design, and computational thinking skills, by learning to programme in a computing language such as HTML and Python.

They will study and learn to understand the principles of networked systems, and the analysis and design of those systems.

Exam boards and assessment.

Edexcel GCSE

Click here for Information about Edexel GCSE Qualification

This qualification is available as both a single and double award, and is as follows:

• The Single Award is two units.

• The Double Award is four units, two of which are the same as the single award.

• The Single Award has one exam paper worth 40% of the total marks, and one controlled assessment worth 60%.

• The Double Award has the same exam paper and controlled assessment task, and then a second exam paper and a second controlled assessment task.

• Single Award Unit 1 Living in a Digital World – In this unit, students explore how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations and society.

• Single Award Unit 2 Using Digital Tools – This is a practical unit. Students broaden and enhance their ICT skills and capability.

• Double Award Unit 3 Digital Design – In this unit, students explore the design of interactive digital products such as websites, computer games and databases.

• Double Award Unit 4 Creating Digital Products – This is a practical unit. Students work with arrange of digital tools and techniques to produce effective ICT solutions in a range of contexts.

OCR Computing

Click here for Information about OCR GCSE Computing Qualification

This carefully planned course gives students a real in-depth understanding of how computer technology works.

It offers an insight into what goes on ‘behind the scenes’, including computer programming.

KS4 Students will learn to do the following:

• Develop their understanding of current and emerging technologies and how they work.

• Look at the use of algorithms in computer programs

• Become independent and discerning users of IT

• Acquire and apply creative and technical skills, knowledge and understanding of ICT in a range of contexts

• Develop computer programs to solve problems

• Evaluate the effectiveness of computer programs/solutions and impact of computer technology in society

Assessment:

Computer systems and programming.

This is assessed by a written paper, which has a mixture of short and long answer questions, some of which require students to write program code.

Practical Investigation.

This will be on a topic chosen from a set of options supplied by OCR (Controlled Assessment).

Programming project.

Students create solutions to computing tasks chosen from a set of options supplied by OCR (Controlled Assessment).

The faculty also offers lunchtime sessions to all KS4 students and after school revision when appropriate.

Key Stage 3

Students complete a 2 year Key Stage 3 course, studying topics across Biology, Chemistry and Physics

There are 10 major areas of study, each area contains 4 topics, making 40 topics in total.

These are studied across Years 7 and 8. The areas of study are:

1. Forces

2. Electricity and magnetism

3. Energy

4. Waves

5. Matter

6. Chemical Reactions

7. Earth and Space

8. The Human Reproductive System

9. Organisms

10. Ecosystems

11. Genes

Key Stage 4

Students study for their GCSE across Years 9, 10 and 11.

The Science GCSE is a double award and students receive 2 grades.

Students will take 6 exams at the end of the course; there is no controlled assessment.

Students study topics across Biology, Chemistry and Physics

Biology Chemistry Physics
1. Cell Biology 8. Atomic structure and the periodic table 18. Energy
2. Organisation 9. Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter 19. Electricity
3. Infection and response 10. Quantitative chemistry 20. Particle model of matter
4. Bioenergetics 11. Chemical changes 21. Atomic structure
5. Homeostasis and response 12. Energy changes 22. Forces
6. Inheritance, variation and evolution 13. The rate and extent of chemical change 23. Waves
7. Ecology 14. Organic chemistry 24. Magnetism and electromagnetism
15. Chemical analysis
16. Chemistry of the atmosphere
17. Using resources

Year 7

Tout sur moi

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to introduce themselves

to describe themselves and other people

to describe their favourite object

about French speaking regions

nouns and articles (le, la, l’, les, un, une, des)

the present tense of avoir

adjectives

in + countries (au, en)

memorisation strategies

ask and answer questions

pronunciation (silent letters at the end of words)

Mon monde perso

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to describe their personality

to talk about family members and friends

give opinions of school subjects

to compare themselves now and how they used to be

the present tenses of avoir and être

adjective agreement

possessive adjectives (mon, ma, mes)

comparaisons (plus, moins … que)

connectives

object pronouns (le, la, les)

reading strategies

memorisation strategies

using transferable language

pronunciation (last consonants as silent letters

Autour de moi

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about school

to talk about where they live

to talk about leisure activities

to describe animals

the present tenses of regular –er verbs and aller, faire, avoir, être

adjective agreement and position

the perfect tense

writing strategies

cognates and false friends

using a bilingual dictionary

pronunciation (accents)

A table

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to say what they eat and drink

to give opinions

to say where they like to eat

to order food at a café

to give quantities and understand recipes

to talk about food specialties

partitive articles (du, de la, de l’, des)

the present tense of manger and boire

negatives

verb + infinitive

memorisation strategies

writing strategies

pronunciation (silent letters at the end of words)

Mon quartier

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to describe a town

to say what you can do

to ask and give directions

to arrange to go out and to meet

il y a / il n’y a pas de

position of adjectives

prepositions

the imperative

modal verbs + infinitive

reading and listening strategies

pronunciation (silent h)

Ça c’est mon truc

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about clothes and styles

to talk about the weather

to discuss weekend activities

to talk about music preferences and national events

the present tense of –er verbs, reflexive verbs and faire

possessive adjectives (son, sa, ses)

memorisation strategies

listening strategies

pronunciation (having a good accent)

Destination vacances

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about usual and preferred holiday

to describe their ideal holiday

to describe a past holiday

to talk about festivals

the present tense of choisir, finir and prendre

the near future tense

verb + infinitive

in + country, city (en , au, aux, à)

the perfect tenses with avoir and of aller

speaking strategies

reading strategies

using a bilingual dictionary

time expressions

pronunciation (liaison after s)

Bouger c’est important

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about sports, leisure activities

to name parts of the body

to talk about sports injuries

to describe sports personalities and sports events

jouer and faire

depuis + present tense

the perfect tenses of aller

verbs + infinitive

j’ai mal au, à la, à l’, aux

checking written work

remembering grammar rules

pronunciation (vowels)

Aux quatre coins du monde

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about where they live and where they are going to live

to describe their daily routine

to talk about what they did yesterday

to discuss what they do to help others

about French speaking countries in Africa

comparisons (plus, moins)

the near future

reflexive verbs

the perfect tense with avoir and être

expressions with avoir (faim, soif, peur)

thinking strategies

speaking strategies

using transferable language

Year 8

C’est quoi la France?

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to compare France and the UK

to describe a country

to talk about French personalities

to talk about transport and new technology

to discuss Francophone cartoon characters

the present tense of –er verbs

use of on

comparatives and superlatives

ask questions

the perfect tense

use qui to link sentences

motivation strategies

agree and disagree

geographical knowledge

cultural awareness

pronunciation (intonation)

Le monde des medias

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about television programmes

to give opinion on musical genres

to talk about film and reviews

to talk about reading preferences

to understand the language of advertising

direct object pronouns

faire + infinitive

rendre + adjective

ce que

verb + infinitive

reading, listening and writing strategies

express and justify opinions

translation strategies

phonics

pronunciation (qu)

Accro à la technologie

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about technology and gadgets

to identify the risk of social networking sites

?discuss the pros and cons of new technologies

adjectives agreement and position

verb + preposition + infinitive

impersonal structures

à + definite article

speaking and reading strategies

memorisation strategies

spoken and written register

debate a point

pronunciation (eu)

Etre ado, c’ect quoi?

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to discuss relationships with parents

to talk about pocket money and helping at home

to discuss pressures faced by teenagers

to discuss life in the past

to describe the life of homeless children

pronouns (me, te, se)

modal verbs (devoir, pouvoir, devoir)

the imperative

the imperfect tenses

ask and answer questions

listening strategies

cultural awareness

pronunciation (silent verb ending, -ent)

En pleine forme

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to discuss healthy lifestyles

to talk about resolutions

to talk about what life in the future

impersonal structures

the pronoun en

the perfect tenses

expression of quantity

the future tense

dictionary skills

use context to work out meaning

evaluate one’s performance

check written work

translate into French

pronunciation (r)

Rendez-vous

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to organise a party

to suggest activities and make excuses

to talk about traditions, festivals or events

to communicate in formal situations

the near future tense

on pourrait + infinitive

the perfect tense with être

the imperfect tense

vous form

speaking strategies

evaluate one’s performance

conversation skills

cultural awareness

pronunciation (perfect and imperfect tense)

Autour du monde

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about travel plans

to compare means of transport

to buy tickets

to describe a past holiday

negatives

the present tense of –ir verbs

si, quand + tense

the perfect and imperfect tense

24 hour clock

memorisation strategies

translation skill

pronunciation (r, u, ou)

Chez moi, ça veut dire quoi?

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about types of homes

to describe rooms in a house

to describe a bedroom

to describe their ideal home

y

depuis + present tense

the present of –re verbs

prepositions

si clauses + imperfect and conditional

translation strategies

different writing styles

debate a point

memorisation strategies

pronunciation (i, y)

Un métier, un rêve !

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about jobs and qualities

to discuss ideal jobs and ambitions

to talk about part-time jobs

to talk about success and failure

masculine and feminine

imperfect tense and the conditional

si clauses

quand + different tenses

ask and answer questions

translation strategies

motivation strategies

pronunciation (tongue twisters)

At Y8 & Y9, students use Allez 1 and Allez 2 textbooks, by Oxford press.

Year 9

Theme Topic Grammar
Identity & culture Relationships with family and friends possessive adjectives

adjective agreement rules

reflexive verbs (se disputer/se fâcher/s’entendre)

comparatives (plus que/moins que)

adverbs of frequency

present tense (regular verbs, avoir and être)

direct object pronouns

Identity & culture Marriage/ partnership position of adjectives

use of qui, que, dont to enhance descriptions

en + present participle

revision of future tense & future tense

direct and indirect object pronouns

Local, national & global areas of interest Home, town, neighbourhood and region il y a, on a, c’est

prepositions

plural partitive article and de after negative

?voir + infinitive

expressions of quantity

irregular verbs aller/faire ceux qui + verb

s’intéresser à

enhancing descriptions using qui/que/dont

demonstrative adjectives ce, cet, cette, ces

Current & future study & employment My studies devoir, il faut + infinitive (compulsory subjects)

parce que/car to express reasons

perfect tense avoir verbs (choisir/décider de/laisser tomber – options)

two verbs together eg aimer/aimer mieux/préférer

comparative and superlative in opinions about subjects

use of tu and vous in informal/formal exchanges

Current & future study & employment Life at school/ college transfer devoir/pouvoir/il faut/vouloir to school rules

si clauses using imperfect and conditional

quantity words beaucoup/trop/assez/pas assez + de

perfect tense with (ce que j’ai fait comme devoirs)

Identity & culture Free-time Music Cinema & TV Eating out Sport present tense incl. irregular verbs sortir, prendre, mettre, voir, vouloir

extend range of two verbs together

future tense introduced for eg weekend plans

adverbs such as d’habitude/normalement

clauses introduced by quand/lorsque and si

Local, national & global areas of interest Social issues Healthy/ unhealthy living partitive articles with food items

recap on devoir/il faut and introduce conditional forms

il vaut mieux/il vaudrait mieux

negative ne…jamais

previous health habits using imperfect tense

Local, national & global areas of interest Charity/ voluntary work vouloir + infinitive

vouloir que + subjunctive

il est possible que + subjunctive

Year 10

Theme Topic Grammar
Identity & culture Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries perfect of verbs with être + agreement rules

reflexive verbs in perfect; perfect and imperfect tenses together

describing a past event/festival; actions and opinions

Local, national & global areas of interest Travel and tourism consolidation of perfect and imperfect tenses

sequencing words, expressions and phrases

avant de/après avoir etc/pendant que/depuis/venir de

developing greater complexity in spoken and written accounts of past events or experiencesweather expressions with faire

Current & future study & employment Education post-16 ce qui/ce que … c’est… sentence pattern

building on si clauses with present and future

more complex two verb structures

Current & future study & employment Career choices and ambitions enhanced statements of possibility including permettre de
Identity & culture Technology in everyday life

Social media

Mobile technology

revision of past tenses to recount how social media have been used; or life before technology

grâce à/sans/avec

enhanced statements of possibility including permettre de

il est possible que + subjunctive

Local, national & global areas of interest Global issues The environment modal verbs linked to behaviours (must do/can do/should do/could do etc)

past tense for effects of behaviours on environment

si sentences revised for outlining consequences of actions

pluperfect tense perspective

Local, national & global areas of interest Global issues Poverty/ homelessness si j’étais…

à la place de … with conditional completions

il faut + infinitive and il faut que + subjunctive

Year 11

Theme Topic Grammar Skills Strategies
Identity & culture Me, my family and friends the present tense

the perfect tense with avoir

the perfect tense with être

the imperfect tense

the pluperfect tense

the near future tense

the future tense

the conditional

modal verbs

reflexive verbs

common irregular verbs

adjectives (agreement and position)

extended sentences and subordinate clauses

direct and indirect object pronouns

verbs + infinitive

opinions

register (tu, vous)

Listening

Speaking

role-play

picture

description

Reading

Writing

message

structured

open-ended

Translation

from French

into French

pronunciation

learning vocabulary

ignoring unecessary words

near-cognates

memorising

coping

using a dicitonary

making use of social and cultural context

unprepared questions

false-friends

idioms

Identity & culture Technology in everyday life
Identity & culture Free time activites
Identity & culture Customs and festivals
Local, national & global areas of interest Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Local, national & global areas of interest Social issues
Local, national & global areas of interest Global issues
Local, national & global areas of interest Travel and tourism
Current & future study & employment My studies
Current & future study & employment Life at school and college
Current & future study & employment Education post-16
Current & future study & employment Jobs, career choices and ambitions

At KS4, students use the AQA GCSE textbooks, by Oxford press.

For further guidance please refer to the Edexcel website by clicking here.

Key Stage 3

At key stage 3 we offer 6 different materials based experiences:

Wood

Metal and plastic

Electronics

Textiles

Food technology

Graphics (Computer Aided design)

At crown Hills we offer one of the most varied and all encompassing DT curriculums of any inner city school.

While other schools are side lining technology and reducing the number of lessons or the range of experiences offered, Crown Hills is continuing to improve and develop its allocation for the subject.

STEM is the big buzz word at the moment both in industry and in schools.

Crown Hills has a STEM zone were maths, science and DT work together to prepare students for further studies and careers in this exciting and rapidly developing industry.

Our vision for Design Technology is the contextual application of maths and science linked with problem solving, creativity and practical skills that are at the core of the DT curriculum.

We are pushing this through our STEM projects which are planned and delivered by teaching “teams” involving staff from Maths, science and Design Technology.

Students begin Y7 in Design Technology with a 6 week key skills program to develop the core design skills needed for success in each material area (the program is currently being updated to include practical key skills and independent and enquiry learning skills).

They then rotate through 3 of the 6 material areas completing an extended design and manufacture project in each area (10 weeks in length).

Students now experience one shorter 7 week project so that they can take part in a STEM enquiry project.

This is then repeated in Y8 with anther more advanced key skills program plus projects in the 3 remaining areas and participation in another STEM project.

Pupils the complete 6 shorter 6 week projects in Y9.

These focus on key skills for GCSE coursework and in some cases producing material that could be included in a GCSE coursework project should the pupil opt to continue with DT at KS4.

One aim of the shorter rotations is to allow pupils to re visit all of the different material areas before they make their GCSE option choices for KS4

All projects follow the design process and complete a linear journey through:

Project brief

Research tasks

Developing a simple specification.

Creating a range of design ideas that follow the specification.

Evaluating the ideas with feedback from potential customers.

Developing and improving the idea.

Modeling the idea using light materials (where appropriate)

Producing a final version of the idea.

Final testing and evaluation.

Each of these areas involves developing and practicing key skills before producing the assessed piece of work.

KS4 GCSE courses

OCR Product Design

This is the generic course we use for students taking our Graphics, electronics and resistant material full course GCSE’s ( Current teachers: J. Hallett, S. Duis, P. Newbold, S. Henry and R. Hill)

OCR Food Technology (Current teacher: K. Muttock)

Click here for the OCR Web Site

AQA Textiles (Current teachers: S. Duis and M. Panting)

Click here for the AQA Web Site

KS4 Btec courses

Level 1 Construction (Current teacher: B. Parra)

Click here for the EDEXEL Web Site

In our GCSE courses we spend the first two terms of Y10 concentration on a design portfolio or folder for their coursework project.

Course work is worth 60% of the total GCSE grade and the portfolio is worth approximately half of this ( I.e 30% of total GCSE).

The first term will focus on activities such as:

Development of a brief or problem to solve through the project.

Product analysis based research focusing on similar products or solutions.

Customer or client based research using surveys and interviews.

Formulation of a product specification.

The second term will focus on activities such as:

Initial designs (sketching and annotation)

Evaluation.

Development of ideas leading to a final concept (often using C.A.D packages like Photoshop or Google sketch up).

The third term in Y10 and the first term and a half of Y11 will focus on practical skills and the manufacturing or modelling of a product in the workshop, followed by testing.

The final term and a half of Y11 will focus on revision for terminal exams.

OCR qualifications have 2 exam units AQA have one longer exam.

Our BTEC Construction course is based mainly on developing practical skills within certain areas of Construction.

There are 2 written units and 4 practical units.

All units have a booklet that must be completed and most have a practical activity to support it .

Although this course is not the equivalent of a GCSE it will offer a good basic grounding for anyone who is considering pursuing a career in Constuction and prefers practical based activities.

The main practical activities we will be doing are:

Carpentry and Joinery

Painting and decorating

Brickwork

Trowel operations

The Expressive Arts Faculty is divided into four different departments: Art, Dance, Drama & Music

At Key Stage 3 each student studies the four Expressive Arts subjects in rotation each year.

At Key Stage 4 students choose Expressive Arts subjects from a list of options that includes subjects from other faculties.

Each Expressive Arts Department offers extra-curricular activities and lessons at lunchtime and after school.

Each department also offers opportunities for students to perform or display their work and go on trips as part of the curriculum.

Art

Key Stage 3 – Students study the National Curriculum for Art learning to develop their creativity and ideas, and improve their artistic skills.

They also learn to understand the work of artists and designers throughout history and up to the present day. They learn to use a range of techniques and materials and understand how to evaluate their work.

Key Stage 4

Year 10 AQA GCSE Art & Design Syllabus 8201.

Year 11 AQA GCSE Art & Design Syllabus 4201.

Extra-curricular Art – Art Clubs are available at lunchtime and after school for Key Stage 3 & 4.

Dance

Key Stage 3 – Dance – Students create and devise their own choreographed work using skills and techniques taught in class alongside the promotion of physical education, health and body awareness.

Key Stage 4 – Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 in Performing Arts

Extra-curricular Dance includes Indian Garba and Bhangra.

Drama

Key Stage 3 – Students learn to improvise, rehearse and perform their own drama using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.

Students discover through the use of the drama medium elements of drama and explorative strategies.

Develop confidence, communication skills, creativity and self-esteem.

Key Stage 4

Year 11 Drama Edexcel GCSE Syllabus 2DR01.

Year 10 Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 in Performing Arts – Acting.

Music

Key Stage 3

Year 7 – Students learn the basics of Music Notation by learning simple tunes on the electronic keyboard and the use of music technology.They find out about the elements of Music.

Students learn ensemble and solo performance skills, about African rhythms and melodies and how to improvise.

Year 8 – Students learn about Indian Music Notation and how to compose their own Indian Music using a Raga.

They also learn a Bollywood melody and remix it to create their own version.

Year 9 – Students learn about Blues Music, and explore how Pop music developed from Blues through other styles and genres to what it is today.

They learn how this music is composed and put together using rhythms, chords, riffs and bass lines.

They also learn about how music is used by the media

Key Stage 4

Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Music

The Music Department offers an extensive extra-curricular timetable of instrumental lessons and ensemble groups.

Parents/Carers may find the following links helpful:

Leicester-Shire Music Education Hub

My Panyard

D-E-A Classes and Tuition

Please find below links to music from our Steel Bands

Merry Christmas

Footsteps

The Lion Sleeps Tonight

Soul Limbo

Just the way you are

Little Mermaid

Stand By Me

Yellow Submarine

All pupils at Crown Hills Community College have two lessons a week on Citizenship and PSHEE (Personal Health and Economic Education) in KS3.

Citizenship education is about enabling pupils to make their own decisions and to take responsibility for their own lives as well as taking in interest and participating in local, national and international issues.

We encourage students to understand their rights and responsibilities and become ‘model’, ‘good’ and ‘active’ citizens both in school and in their futures.

We encourage pupils to relate to real life events, controversial and topical issues that encourage and develop thinking, research and debating skills as well as numeracy and literacy skills.

Our PSHEE lessons develop self-confidence and strategies to deal with lifes challenges and explore opportunities of adult and working life.

Citizenship and PSHEE is about developing :

•Knowledge and understanding:

•Skills and aptitudes: Critical thinking, analysing information, expressing opinions, taking part in discussions, debates, negotiating, conflict resolution and participating in community action.

•Values and dispositions: Respect for justice, democracy and the rule of law, openness, tolerance, courage to defend a point of view and a willingness to listen to, work with and stand up for others.

Citizenship and PSHEE is important because it addresses real issues, relating to social justice, human rights, community cohesion and developing students SMSC awareness (Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural) both now and in the future.

The Life Skills KS3 Curriculum at a glance

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9
Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, rights & responsibilities, the work of the school council, having your say and democracy. Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, rights & responsibilities, the Law, ASBO’s, young offenders, gangs, mock trial, sentencing and the youth offending team. Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, responsibilities, justice, Human Rights, police rights, surveillance, terrorism, freedom of information and equality.
Citizenship 2 = Communities and identities, being good and active citizens, changing our community and bringing communities together. Citizenship 2 = Local communities and local government involves understanding local issues, the work of the council, stereotyping, racism, sexism, discrimination and the law. Citizenship 2 = National Government and National Politics, political parties, various voting systems, role of MP’s, Houses of Parliament, law making, pressure groups, UK Government and the monarchy.
Citizenship 3 = Being a global citizen, understanding child labour, Fair trade, charity and volunteering. Citizenship 3 = Human rights in a global community, refugees, migration, media and the free press. Citizenship 3 = Britain and the world: Europe, the Commonwealth, United Nations, Northern Ireland and South Africa.
PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships. (Including anti-bullying week). Dealing with homework, family issues, domestic violence etc. PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships looks at self-esteem, shyness, leisure time, beating boredom, divided families, domestic violence, friendship, culture, lifestyle and influences. We also investigate stereotypes. PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships looks at becoming an adult, dealing with loss and bereavement, assertive behaviour, mental illness and racism.
PSHEE 2 = You and your money, looks at money management and being a consumer. PSHEE 2 = You and your money investigates financial risks and gambling awareness. PSHEE 2 = You and your money looks at banking, savings and being a green consumer.
PSHEE 3 = You and work, looks at skills, qualities, qualifications, doing market research, designing, marketing and presenting a product as a group. PSHEE 3 = You and work looks at the organisation of firms, employment and unemployment, different industries, finance, risk and profit. PSHEE 3 = You and work looks at decision making, knowing our strengths, skills and qualities.(including the Options module) and undertaking careers research.
PSHEE 4 = You and your body: looks at puberty and the awareness of drugs and smoking. PSHEE 4 = Keeping healthy looks at the risk and awareness of alcohol and drugs, physical safety at home and in the streets PSHEE 4 =You and your body looks at adolescence, eating disorders, drugs awareness, positive body image, physical safety, relationships and STI’s

In KS4, (year 10 and 11) pupils undertake a GCSE in Humanities (AQA Board), this integrates religious studies, history, geography and Life Skills.

Students look at four key areas, they are examined on this and the exam is worth 75% of their final grade.

In addition, pupils work independently to complete a 2,000 word essay in controlled conditions with support from their Life Skills teacher.

This is worth 25% of the final grade.

Pupils are provided with a source booklet prior to the exam to work from, annotate and prepare for prior to the exam.

Culture and Core Beliefs

• Understanding common and contrasting cultures

• Understanding simple and complex cultures

• Understanding subculture, agents of socialisation, identity and IQ

• Understanding the nature V nurture debate

• Understanding laws, morals values, beliefs and rituals

• Understanding migration and multiculturalism

• Investigating social, moral, political or religious issues (capital punishment, euthanasia, medical ethics, the monarchy etc)

Conflict and Cooperation

• Understanding causes and effects of conflict.

• Understanding Human Rights, freedoms and responsibilities.

• Conflict at a local level (bullying)

• Conflict at a national level (apartheid and South Africa)

• Conflict at an international level (Rwanda)

• Students have the opportunity to select other conflicts i.e. Syria, Palestine, Afghanistan, Iraq as case studies etc.

Environment

• Environmental problems (pollution, global warming, habitats, climate change, exploitation, tourism etc.)

• Understanding renewable and non-renewable resources

• Looking at the energy crises

• Individual and group responses to the environment, the work of political groups, pressure groups and business

• Solutions to environmental problems

• Investigating case studies: Tropical rainforests, deforestation, coral reefs etc.

• Investigating sustainable solutions

• Investigating National Parks

People and work

• Understanding the relevance of work in different cultures

• Motivations for work

• Understanding leisure and work satisfaction

• Understanding the impact of unemployment

• Understanding the impact of technology

• Understanding the three main employment sectors

• Explaining globalisation and multinational companies and the change in working patterns

• Looking at economic migration

• Investigating case studies involving conflict in the workplace, equality legislation and the role of trade unions

In 2016, the faculty has also started delivering Citizenship GCSE at KS4

This is 100% exam based and includes the following topics

RIGHTS, THE LAW AND THE LEGAL SYSTEM IN ENGLAND AND WALES DEMOCRACY AND GOVERNMENT THE UK AND THE WIDER WORLD
Rights and responsibilities Democracy, elections and voting in the UK Identities and diveristy in the UK society
The law National, local, regional and devolved government The UK and its relations with the wider world.
The legal system The British Constitution
The economy, finance and money
The role of the media and free press
Citizenship participation and action
Politics beyond the UK

Please encourage your child to use sophisticated vocubulary, watch/read the news and develop an opinion on what is going on locally, nationall and internationally.

Try to discuss current affairs with them and encourage them to attend the numerous revision sessions that the school offers during lunchtimes and after school.

Revision booklets are provided closer to the exams.

In addition we teach a one off Life Skills lesson which prepares students for the wider world.

Students look at:

Financial Management Work SRE British Values
Consumer/Banking/ Debt/ Financial Management Economic Enterprise/understanding payslips/insurance CV’s, letters of application, UCAS, personal statements, charity work and volunteering Teenage Parent Contraception lesson SR awareness Forced marriage Mental Health Eating disorders Homophobia Legal Highs/Shisha Smoking SEN/Drug Awareness Diabetic awareness Cancer awareness Radicalisation Gang Culture Knife Crime Anti-Social Behavior

HISTORY CURRICULUM

Year 7

Autumn – Spring Term

Crown Vs the people – A study looking at the actions of different monarchs and key characters in history between 1066 and 1400 and considering how these have shaped Britain including people such as William the Conqueror, Simon de Montfort, Henry II, Thomas Becket. We also look at what life was like in this time considering issues such as the Black Death.

Spring – Summer Term

Turbulent Tudors- An in depth look at the different Tudor monarchs and how they helped to shape Britain. We consider the changes to religion they brought as well as moving on to look at the Stuarts.

Year 8

Autumn term

Empire to equality – An outline study considering the Slave trade and its abolition, as well as life for Black Americans in 20th Century America.

Spring term

The Industrial Revolution – A depth study considering the changes in Britain between 1750 and 1850 including the rise of factories and the working conditions for child labourers.

Summer term

Conflict in the twentieth century- A thematic study looking at how conflict has evolved and developed over the last 100 years considering events such as WW1, WW2, the dropping of the atomic bomb, the Vietnam was as well as modern day terrorism.

Year 9

Autumn – Spring Term

America 1910-1929- Starting the GCSE syllabus this module looks at developments in America such as the intolerance faced by immigrants, political factions and black Americans. We also look at the economic issues surrounding the economic boom of the 1920s leading to eventual Wall Street Crash in 1929. We finish the topic looking at the social side of the 1920s looking at what people did for fun and attitudes to women and how these developed over the period.

Spring – Summer Term

The development of Germany 1919-1991- our second GCSE module looks at the development of Germany from 1919 with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles through Hitler’s reign all the way through the cold war culminating in the tearing down of the Berlin wall in 1989 and the aftermath and impact on Germany.

Year 10- Eduqas specification

Autumn Term

The Elizabethan Age, 1558-1603- We look at how Elizabeth gained control over the country, the issues she had with religion and foreign powers alongside how her reign impacted upon normal people in society.

Spring Term

Changes in Health and Medicine in Britain, c.500 to the present day- We look thematically at key figures and influences in the changing of medicine.

Year 11

Recap of the year 9 and 10 modules with focussed revision.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES CURRICULUM

Year 7

Autumn Term

Introduction to Religious studies, Philosophy and Ethics – A study of the identity of God across religions

Creation Theory and Identity of God – A study of views of creation with a philosophical look to scientific and religious creation theory.

Spring Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Festivals

Summer Term – No RS as Humanities rotations

Year 8

Autumn – Spring Term

Holy books and Moral codes – A study into holy books and moral codes with an investigation into medical ethics

Spring – Summer Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Year 9 Autumn – Spring Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Spring – Summer Term

Worship Beliefs and Practices – A study of beliefs and practices of religious groups

Year 10 – WJEC Eduqas GCSE in Religious Studies

Autumn Term

COMPONENT 2 – Christian Beliefs and Teachings

COMPNENT 3 – Hindu Beliefs & Teaching

Spring Term

COMPONENT 1 – Issues of Relationships

COMPONENT 1 – Issues of life and death

Summer Term

COMPONENT 2 – Christianity Practices

Year 11 – OCR B Religion Philosophy and Applied Ethics

Autumn Term

Philosophy 2 – Good and evil

Ethics 2 – Religion, Peace and justice

Spring Term

Philosophy 2 – Religion and Science

Ethics 2 – Religion and the Media

Summer Term

Revision

GEOGRAPHY CURRICULUM

Year 7

Pupils are taught on a rotation so will either study Geography or History for the first half term and then swap in the second half term.

Autumn – Spring Term

An Introduction to Geography incorporating geographical skills e.g. map work

Settlement

Spring – Summer Term

Weather and climate

Ecosystems

Year 8

Autumn – Spring Term

Coasts

Population

Spring – Summer Term>

Development

Rivers

Year 9

3 Units taught in rotation to all teaching groups:

Population

Coasts

Start the OCR A GCSE Course

Year 10

OCR GCSE Geography Specification A

Autumn Term

Ecosystems

Environmental threats

Spring Term

People and the planet

Field work and geographical skills

Summer Term

People of the UK

Year 10

OCR A Specification- Geographical Themes.

The course is comprised of 3 units

1 content exams: Living in the UK today and the World Around us

1 field work skills exam

Autumn Term

Ecosystems

Environmental threats

Spring- Summer Term

People and the planet

Field work

Year 11

OCR GCSE Geography Specification B (J385)

The course is comprised of 3 units

B561 Sustainable Decision Making Exercise (SDME) = 25%

B562 Controlled Assessment Coursework (The Fieldwork Focus) = 25%

B563 Geographical Themes – the Terminal exam 50% based on themes 1 (rivers & coasts), 2 (population & settlement) and 4 (economic development)

Units B561 & B563 have tiered entry, either Foundation or Higher

Autumn Term

Controlled Assessment- The Fieldwork Focus.

Theme 4 Economic Development

Spring and Summer Term

Theme 3 Population to prepare for the SDME exam on May 13.

Revision of Themes 1 & 2 for terminal exam on May 22.

KS 3 and KS 4 PE

The best way of supporting your child will be to encourage them to increase fitness levels and be able to swim at least 25meters.

Encourage them by working with them on fitness activities at home whether this is spending 30mins jogging, cycling, swimming etc.

Activities that will make them out of breath.

Aim to do this 3-5 times a week

Below is a link for Spence street leisure centre showing pool times and possible swimming classes to help your child achieve the 25m goal.

Spence Street Leisure Centre

Potential fitness circuits you could do at home could be searched from the following web link

Home Exercise and Fitness

If your child shows an interest in a sport then take them to a local club to try it out. Use the following link to search the sport of interest.

BBC Get Inspired

Throughout their time in school pupils will be looking to develop Fitness and will be involved in a variety of sports.

These will be done on rotational method.

Sports they might experience Football, Netball, Badminton, Basketball, Cricket, Rounders, Gymnastics, Athletics, Volleyball, Fitness, Table Tennis

Encourage your child to participate in extracurricular activities either inside or outside of school.

KS4 BTEC Sport

If your child chooses Btec Sport as an option then the following link will give more information.

Edexel Web Site

Pupils will complete 4 units.

2 core units. Unit 1 Fitness for sport and Exercise (Will be an online exam).

Unit 2 Practical Sports performance

2 optional units. Unit 4 The sports performer in Action.

Unit 6 Leading Sports Activities.

In Leicester City there are 288 children who have a hearing impairment.

Some hearing losses are greater than others; therefore individual students will require different levels of support.

The majority of students attend their local main stream schools and are support by a Peripatetic Teacher of the Deaf within that setting.

However, there are students who, for a variety of reasons, need more intensive support.

These students are placed here at Crown Hills Community College where there is a unit designed to support Deaf students both academically and socially.

Every day they have access to Teachers of the Deaf and support staff that are specifically trained to teach and support them.

The teacher of the Deaf deliver language based subjects in the unit.

These include English, Humanities and Life Skills.

The rest of the curriculum is delivered in the mainstream setting with support from the specialist staff.

Tutorials are also a big part of the unit support.

During these sessions the students are given time to consolidate subject specific language on a one to one basis.

The unit setting also allows the students to develop their language and communication skills, both of which will be significantly delayed.

Over the years, the number of students who have attended the unit has fluctuated between twelve and one.

At the present time we have four students in the unit: two year 11 and two year 9.

There are a further four students who are taught in the mainstream of the school with support from a Teacher of the Deaf (on a regular basis but not in the unit)

The new facilities in the unit are superb.

The sound proof rooms mean that the students are getting the best possible access to the curriculum.

Hearing tests and equipment checks can be carried out with confidence, knowing that the outcome will be accurate.

Art
Key Stage 3
At Key Stage 3 students study Art through the delivery of 6 mini GCSE style projects. The projects provide a rich variety of practically based learning opportunities that build knowledge and understanding and give students the time to explore and refine their skills in preparation for Key Stage 4. Students are exposed to a broad range of materials and techniques, but are always encouraged to experiment and develop their own learning journeys.

Year 7 projects
Formal Element – An introduction to five of the formal elements of art, including line, shape, mark making, colour and pattern. Students explore these elements through experimentation and links to artists such as Vincent Van Gogh, M.C Esher, Andre Derain and Bridget Riley. The formal elements are the bases of all pieces of artwork.
Natural Forms Printmaking – An explorative project focusing on recording, developing and refining. Students develop their own still life set up using natural forms in the style of given artists. Students then photograph these and develop their initial photographs through ICT, mono printings and collograph printing.
3D Sea Creatures – A 3D design and make project where students look at the illustrative drawings of scientist and artist Ernst Heckle and develop their initial studies into 3D sea creatures.  Students are encouraged to independently explore a range of materials to manipulate and model into a 3D sculpture.

Year 8 projects
Art of Sport – A graphic type project focusing on movement in art and recording through cut work.  Students look at the work of the Futurist group and develop their own sports theme pieces in the style of Henri Matisse and the Olympic Athlete and Artist Roald Bradstock.  This project has been developed to link to the school’s sports specialism status.
Abstract Art – An experimental project focusing on art and emotions. Students look at how artists have used art to show their thoughts and feelings. Students look at what abstract art means to them and how they can use codes and conventions to ‘read’ a painting. Students explore painting to music in the style of Kandinsky as well as the action paintings of Jackson Pollock. The project culminates with a 3D sculpture inspired by Frank Stella.
Cubist Masks – A 3D clay project focusing on the cubist portrait work of Pablo Picasso. Students look at Picasso’s African influences and explore these patterns and shapes through clay in the form of a tile.  Students then develop these initial experimentations into a Cubist style clay mask.

Key Stage 4
Year 9
In Year 9 students have the opportunity to further develop and secure their Art and Design skills and knowledge.  They are shown how to accurately record from observation and develop initial ideas into their own individual and personal outcomes.  Students continue to build on the skills and techniques used at Key Stage 3 with the introduction of new advanced techniques such collograph printing and 3D card modeling. Students are guided and nurtured to ultimately have the confidence to discover their own unique skills and talents and excel in their final assessments and exam pieces.
Celebrity – This project has a heavy focus on drawing and recording. Students are taught how to grid up a drawing and copy it accurately. Students look at a range of Pop Artists such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein and Hattie Stewart. Students learn how to work in the style of an artist without copying their work. They learn to successfully develop their initial ideas into a final piece.
Masks – This extended project is designed to replicate that of a GCSE project. Students are given 3 starting points African, Sci-fi and Masquerade. They are taught how to record, develop, refine and present their work to meet GCSE criteria and expectations. Students are encouraged to continue to practice and explore drawing techniques.

Year 10 and Year 11
We currently offer AQA GCSE Fine Art (course code 8202).  On starting Year 10 students are well accustomed to independent working and know where their artistic strengths lie. In Year 10 and 11 students need to complete work for their coursework portfolio. This usually consists of a mini project and a major more sustained project that counts as 60% of the final grade.
Project 1 – We encourage students to focus on their drawing skills as this is valued and highly rewarded on the exam board assessment criteria.
Project 2 – This project is developed through Year 10 and into Year 11.  Students are encouraged to create a highly personal and independent body of work as a culmination of everything they have been taught in the previous 4 years.
Externally set task and 10 hour exam (40% of total marks) – The course concludes with a practical exam project which is set by the exam board. Students are supported in lessons to produce their initial observations, developments and refinements. All of which are submitted for final assessment along with the final outcome produced in the unaided 10 hour exam.
Each year we organise an Art exhibition for our Year 11 GCSE students to celebrate their hard work, commitment and show case their successes.

Extra-curricular Art
Art Clubs are available at lunchtime and after school for Key Stages 3 & 4. We are currently running an Art Master class for our most able students where they have the opportunity to study some of the Art Greats. During these sessions students are working on canvas with oil paints.

Dance
Key Stage 3
Dance focuses on the promotion of physical education and the benefits it can have for a student’s health and wellbeing. Students start to develop a range of skills including co-ordination, stamina and confidence. They create and learn a range of choreography in different dance styles using techniques taught in class.

Key Stage 4
Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award: Performing Arts.

Extra-curricular Dance
Includes Street Dance and Contemporary Music

Drama
Key Stage 3
Drama at Key Stage 3 focuses on the promotion of communication and confidence skills. Using practical and creative tasks individually and collaboratively our students are supported to develop into confident and independent individuals.
Students start to develop a range of skills including discussion work, evaluation, performing and creating using a variety of styles and genres and learning from practitioners.

Key Stage 4
Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 Tech Award: Performing Arts.

Extra-curricular Drama
Underachievers and Catch-up support club
Choir and Musical Theatre
Key Stage 3 Drama Club

Music
Key Stage 3
Year 7
Students learn the basics of music staff notation by learning simple tunes on the electronic keyboard and on a wind instrument taught in ensemble lessons. Students use music technology to learn to compose and understand the elements of music. Students learn ensemble and solo performance skills in wind band lessons. In ensemble lessons using African instruments they discover more about African rhythms and melodies and how to improvise.

Year 8
Students learn about Indian music notation and how to compose their own Indian music using a Raga. They learn Bhangra melodies and rhythms as well as a Bollywood melody. They use music technology to remix these to create their own composition in an Indian genre.
In Year 8 ensemble lessons students use electronic keyboards and pitched percussion to learn about Blues Music, they explore how Pop music developed from Blues through other styles and genres to what it is today. They learn to compose in the Blues style putting together rhythms, chords, riffs and bass lines.

Key Stage 4
Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Music
Students’ study:
Unit 1 – The music industry
Unit 2 – Managing a music product
Unit 4 – Introducing composing
Unit 5 – Introducing performing
This course prepares students for further study in Music and is a foundation for ‘A’ Level Music and vocational courses

The Music Department offers an extensive extra-curricular timetable of instrumental lessons and ensemble groups. Students also have the opportunity to take Grade exams in musical instruments and in Music Theory.

Parents/Carers may find the following links helpful:
Leicester-Shire Music Education Hub
My Panyard
D-E-A Classes and Tuition
Crown Hills Records at https://store.cdbaby.com/Artist/VariousArtists3732

Please find below links to music from our Steel Bands

Please find below links to music from our Steel Bands 

Merry Christmas 

Footsteps 

The Lion Sleeps Tonight 

Soul Limbo 

Just the way you are 

Little Mermaid 

Stand By Me 

Yellow Submarine 

Year 7
Pupils are taught on a rotation so will either study Geography or History for the first half term and then swap in the second half term.

Autumn – Spring Term
An Introduction to Geography incorporating geographical skills e.g. map work
Settlement

Spring – Summer Term
Weather and climate
Ecosystems

Year 8
Autumn – Spring Term
Coasts
Population

Spring – Summer Term
Development
Rivers

Year 9
3 Units taught in rotation to all teaching groups:
Population
Coasts
Start the OCR A GCSE Course

Year 10
OCR GCSE Geography Specification A
Autumn Term
Ecosystems
Environmental threats

Spring Term
People and the planet
Field work and geographical skills

Summer Term
People of the UK

Year 10
OCR A Specification- Geographical Themes.
The course is comprised of 3 units
1 content exams: Living in the UK today and the World Around us
1 field work skills exam

Autumn Term
Ecosystems
Environmental threats

Spring- Summer Term
People and the planet
Field work

Year 11
OCR GCSE Geography Specification B (J385)
The course is comprised of 3 units
B561 Sustainable Decision Making Exercise (SDME) = 25%
B562 Controlled Assessment Coursework (The Fieldwork Focus) = 25%
B563 Geographical Themes – the Terminal exam 50% based on themes 1 (rivers & coasts), 2 (population & settlement) and 4 (economic development)
Units B561 & B563 have tiered entry, either Foundation or Higher

Autumn Term
Controlled Assessment- The Fieldwork Focus.
Theme 4 Economic Development

Spring and Summer Term
Theme 3 Population to prepare for the SDME exam on May 13.
Revision of Themes 1 & 2 for terminal exam on May 22.

In MFL we aspire to use the Target Language in every day college life, and to develop a knowledge of language to be used outside school: on holiday, in a future work situation for example. We are committed to learn all key and topic specific vocabulary as well as all grammar points and tenses. We are also committed be curious and to learn about the culture and customs of the people who live in French speaking countries. We are successful when we build on previous knowledge in order to achieve the higher grade we are capable of.

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9 Year 10 Year 11
Vocabulary
  • Hobbies
  • Home
  • School and clothes
  • Daily routine
  • French speaking countries
  • Me & my family
  • Health
  • Media
  • Holiday
  • Customs
  • Free time
  • Home
  • School
  • Technology
  • Travel
  • Festivals
  • Technology
  • Global issues
  • Social issues
  • Post-16
  • Identity and Culture
  • Local, national and Global areas of interest
  • Study and Employment
Grammar
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Clauses
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Negative
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Object pronouns
  • Complex structures
  • Masculine / feminine, singular / plural
  • Adjective, adverb, comparative, superlative
  • Conjugated verb + infinitive
  • Negative
  • Clauses
  • Object pronouns
  • Complex structures
Tenses
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Future tense
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Future tense
  • Conditional
  • Present tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Subjunctive
  • Present tense
  • Perfect tense
  • Imperfect tense
  • Pluperfect tense
  • Near future tense
  • Future tense
  • Conditional
  • Subjunctive
Skills
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing
  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing

RELIGIOUS STUDIES CURRICULUM
Year 7 – Students will explore sources of wisdom and authority within a broad range of religions and will consider how these teachings and beliefs influence followers. Two Religious Studies topics are studied across the year.  These are:

  •      Founders and Creation Stories – A study of founders, key figures and creation stories.
  •      Pilgrimages and celebrations – A study of key places of pilgrimage and the key celebrations.

Year 8 –  Students will explore sources of wisdom and authority within a broad range of religions and will consider how these teachings and beliefs influence followers. Two Religious Studies topics are studied across the year.  These are:

  • Holy books and Moral codes – A study into holy books and moral codes with an investigation into medical ethics
  • Worship, beliefs and practices – this acts as an introduction to GCSE Religious Studies.

KS4 – WJEC Eduqas GCSE in Religious Studies

COMPONENT 1

  •  Issues of Relationships
  • Issues of life and death
  • Issues of Good and Evil
  • Issues of Human Rights

COMPONENT 2:

  • Christian Beliefs and Teachings
  •  Christianity Practices

COMPNENT 3:

  • Islam Beliefs & Teaching
  • Islam Practices

Computer Science

This carefully planned course gives students a real in-depth understanding of how computer technology works.
It offers an insight into what goes on ‘behind the scenes’, including computer programming.
For suitable KS4 Computing students they will learn to do the following:
• Develop their understanding of current and emerging technologies and how they work.
• Look at the use of algorithms in computer programs
• Become independent and discerning users of IT
• Acquire and apply creative and technical skills, knowledge and understanding of Computing in a range of contexts
• Develop computer programs to solve problems
• Evaluate the effectiveness of computer programs/solutions and impact of computer technology in society

Assessment:
You will have the potential to gain a GCSE Computing Science qualification graded 1-9; with exam and range of topics supplied by OCR. This is an Ebaccalaureate subject option. The course is assessed by a written paper, which has a mixture of short and long answer questions, some of which require students to write program code. This course is 100% assessed by external examination.
Click here for Information about OCR GCSE Computing Qualification

Computer Science

This carefully planned course gives students a real in-depth understanding of how computer technology works.
It offers an insight into what goes on ‘behind the scenes’, including computer programming.
For suitable KS4 Computing students they will learn to do the following:
• Develop their understanding of current and emerging technologies and how they work.
• Look at the use of algorithms in computer programs
• Become independent and discerning users of IT
• Acquire and apply creative and technical skills, knowledge and understanding of Computing in a range of contexts
• Develop computer programs to solve problems
• Evaluate the effectiveness of computer programs/solutions and impact of computer technology in society

Assessment:
You will have the potential to gain a GCSE Computing Science qualification graded 1-9; with exam and range of topics supplied by OCR. This is an Ebaccalaureate subject option. The course is assessed by a written paper, which has a mixture of short and long answer questions, some of which require students to write program code. This course is 100% assessed by external examination.
Click here for Information about OCR GCSE Computing Qualification

Creative iMedia GCSE
Creative iMedia
If you like creating things on the computer, then Creative iMedia is the course you might choose.
It has 4 units, 3 of them are based on your coursework in making and changing images using Photoshop, making webpages and making games using Game Maker. One unit has a written exam to do, which is done in January of Year 10, but may be retaken if needed. All the 4 units are worth 25% of the overall grade each.
By taking this option you will be taking a Level 2 VCF course (not a BTEC) from OCR.
You will have the potential to gain GCSE grades 1 – 9 on successful completion of the course. A sample of typical units is listed below with explanation of the skillset assessed on the unit.

R081: Pre-production skills.  This is a compulsory unit, based on all aspects of planning projects from Mood boards to Gantt Charts. It will also develop their understanding of the client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques that form part of the planning and creation process. For the assessment of this unit, the students will be entered for an exam, which may be retaken if needed.
R082: Creating digital graphics.  This is also a compulsory unit, in which Photoshop is used to edit photographs and images to suit given situations. For the assessment of this unit, students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.
R085: Creating a multiple website. In this unit, Students will have the opportunity to understand the basics of creating multiple websites through this unit. They will also be able to demonstrate their creativity by combining components to create a functional, intuitive and aesthetically pleasing website using Dreamweaver or Web Plus. For the assessment of this unit students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.
R092: Developing digital games. Through this unit, students will examine the basics of creating digital games and their environments for the creative and digital media sector. They will also develop the know-how to create a playable game from an existing design or brief. For the assessment of this unit, students will complete a 10 hour controlled assessment which is marked by the teaching staff and externally moderated.

Click here for Information about OCR iMedia GCSE Qualification

Here at Crown Hills, we are committed to encouraging all our pupils to read widely for pleasure. Literacy skills underpin all aspects of academic learning and education and there is no refuting the evidence that a reading child is a successful child.

A number of initiatives are currently in place at Crown Hills to support, encourage and develop the reading skills of all of our pupils. We ensure that every child in the school has fifteen minutes of dedicated literacy development time for four mornings each week, adding up to an hour each week.

All our pupils are tested to establish their reading levels, and a number of interventions are in place to develop pupils’ confidence and skills. One of these initiatives is the VIP (the Vocabulary Improvement Programme), a 12 lesson unit of work designed to develop the vocabulary, reading and writing skills of pupils falling about 2 years below their actual age in terms of reading comprehension. 52 pupils in years 7 and 8 have completed the programme so far, and of these, 40 have shown a significant improvement in their reading, with an average increase of 2 years in the space of a few weeks. This is a 77% success rate and we plan to continue and expand the programme in the future.

All pupils are issued with their reading ages and our library is extremely well stocked with books tailored to all reading abilities; pupils are able to find books appropriately challenging but accessible for their age and ability. To support this, our Librarian has painstakingly taken the time to ensure all books are labelled with reading age needed for the content. Many of our more able readers become Leaders of Literacy and support their peers with reading and other literacy development strategies. Likewise, all teaching staff have access to the reading ages of pupils in their classes and tailor their lessons and reading materials to match the needs of the children.

A recent reading survey, conducted by a third party, has provided some very encouraging results in regard to our pupils’ attitude towards reading for pleasure. These include:

o The percentage of pupils liking the books Crown Hills has to offer continues to rise.

o At Crown Hills a higher percentage of boys than girls want to become a better reader.

o 76% of pupils felt that regular readers are people “who want to do well”.

o 85% of pupils who completed the survey said they enjoy reading.

o 85% of our pupils who completed the reading survey, read at home for pleasure at least once per week.

o 24% of pupils read for pleasure at home every day.

A number of students at Crown Hills College have difficulties with reading. Some students have learning difficulties and others are new to English. We strive to identify students, through one to one assessments, for additional support to develop their reading. Once identified, we use appropriate interventions. We deliver Read Write Inc. Fresh Start to students with limited reading skills. This is a phonic based intervention which aims to secure phonic knowledge and decoding. For students at the next level, we deliver Rapid Plus during morning literacy time. This aims to boost reading comprehension, and students have made great leaps in their reading through this.

There are a number of students at Crown Hills who are new to English and are supported by the EAL department. The EAL staff support reading through reading groups during literacy time. These groups focus on building vocabulary and high frequency words. They use the Oxford Reading Tree for the new arrivals. For the students who have been in the country for a longer period of time, the EAL staff also use Rapid Plus. Last year, some EAL students from Year 11 were used as group leaders to support Year 8 EAL students with their reading. This was successful and so the same is planned for this academic year. During morning literacy time, we also deliver Lexia, an online literacy intervention, to larger groups of students. The results from our trial of Lexia were fantastic in giving a boost to reading and spelling skills. For some students, reading comprehension and ‘reading between the lines’ are more of a challenge. For these students we can deliver Inference Training in small groups.

YEAR 7 CATCH-UP GRANT FOR 2014/2015
Details Income Expenditure
Year 7 Catch Up Grant 2014/15  33,500.00
Resources 84.45
Tutor 7,900.00
Tutor 7,806.11
Total 33,500.00 15,709.56
Balance 17,709.44

Balance of £17,709.44 will cover Tutors Salary for this academic year (2015/16) as we have not been notified if funding is to continue.

English At Crown Hills Community College
Year 7 & 8

English Language & Literature

Students will engage with poetry, plays, novels and a variety of non-fiction texts.

Students will write creatively and respond critically to texts.

Speaking & Listening activities will take place throughout the years.

Students will undertake two author studies a year.

Students will complete reading and writing assessments which mirror the questions they will be asked in their AQA examinations in Y11.

Students will sit two exam papers which mirror exactly what they will face in their exams in Y11.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

Year 9

English Literature GCSE (Year 1)

Students will begin their GCSE English Literature course in preparation for their examination at the end of Y10 if they are ready, Year 11 if they are not.

Students will write creatively and respond critically to texts.

Speaking & Listening activities will take place throughout the year.

Students will study texts which will prepare them for their exam texts.

Students will complete reading and writing assessments which mirror the questions they will be asked in their AQA examinations in Y10/11.

Students will sit two exam papers which mirror exactly what they will face in their exams in Y10/Y11.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

Year 10 & 11

English Language and English Literature GCSE

Students study the AQA exam board.

They will study for two separate GCSEs.

Each exam is 100% final exam; there is no longer any coursework or controlled assessments.

There is now only one tier of entry. Every student attempts the same exam paper.

Grades will be given from 1-9.

Students will learn through a variety of teaching methods such as: paired work, group work, drama based responses, independent enquiry, becoming an expert and teaching others, using technology as a learning aid and using thinking methods.

English Language

Students must complete one Spoken Language assessment that is recorded but does not contribute to the overall grade.

Paper One is fiction based and lasts 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Students will answer 4 questions in response to a fiction extract.

Students will complete one written response – either a piece of description or a narrative.

Paper Two is non-fiction based and lasts 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Students will answer 4 questions in response to two non-fiction extracts.

Students will complete one written response – either a letter, article, leaflet, essay or speech.

English Literature

Paper One asks students to respond to a Shakespeare play and a pre-20th century novel and lasts for 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Paper Two asks students to respond to a modern text, two studied poems and two unseen poems and lasts for 2 hours and 15 minutes.

Texts that may be studied include

‘Macbeth’

‘Romeo & Juliet’

‘Much Ado About Nothing’

‘A Christmas Carol’

‘An Inspector Calls’

‘Animal Farm’

‘The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time’

A Poetry Anthology

USEFUL INFORMATION

ARI Cycle 2017 including dates
Foundation revision checklist
Foundation revision schedule
Higher revision checklist
Higher Revision Schedule
Maths Price List
Exam Dates for GCSE Mathematics 2017-18
KEY STAGE 3
The exact content and depth in which each of these topics will be covered will be dependent on whether your child is following the support, core or able scheme of work.
Year 7

Topics

Induction activities

Using Numbers

Sequences

Perimeter and Area

Decimal Numbers

Working with Numbers

Statistics

Algebra

Fractions

Angles

Coordinates and Graphs

Percentages

Probability

Symmetry

Equations

Interpreting Data

3D shapes

Ratio

Year 8

Topics

Working with Numbers

Geometry

Geometry/ Assess

Probability

Percentages

Sequences

Area of 2D & 3D shapes

Graphs

Simplifying Numbers

Interpreting Data

Algebra

Congruence and scaling

Fractions and Decimals

Proportion

Circles

Equations and Formulae

Comparing Data

STEM Project

Recommended support resources for Years 7 and 8 are Collins Connect and My Maths
GCSE Mathematics
The depth to which your child will cover each topic may vary depending on their ability group and rate of progress.
Year 9 Higher

Topics

Basic Number

Fractions, Ratio and Proportion

Statistical Diagrams

Number Sequences

Ratio and Proportion

Angles

Transformations

Algebraic Manipulation

Length, Area and Volume

Linear Graphs

Right-angles Triangles

End of Year Assessmen

Year 9 Foundation

Topics

Basic Number

Measures and Scale Drawing

Charts, tables, Averages

Angles

Number Properties

Approximations

Decimals and Fractions

Linear Graphs

Expressions and Formulae

Ratio, Speed and Proportion

End of year assessment

Year 10 Higher

Topics

Similarity

Exploring and Applying Probability

Powers and Standard Form

Equations and Inequalities

Accuracy and Surds

Quadratic Equations

End of Year Assessment

Year 10 Foundation

Topics

Perimeter and Area

Transformations

Probability and Events

Volumes, Surface Area

Linear Equations

Percentages and Compound Measures

Percentages and Variation

Statistics

Construction and Loci

End of Year Assessment

Year 11 Higher

Topics

Sampling and More Complex Diagrams

Combined Events

Properties of Circles

Variation

Triangles

Graphs

Algebraic Fractions and Functions

Vector Geometry

Revision

Final Examination

Year 11 Foundation

Topics

Curved shapes and Pyramids

Number and Sequences

Right-angled Triangles

Congruency and Similarity

Probability: Combined Events

Powers and Standard Form

Simultaneous Equations

Linear Inequalities

Non-linear Graphs

Revision

Final Examination

Recommended support resources for Years 9 to 11 are Collins Connect and My Maths and Maths Watch CD
KS4 Qualifications

AQA GCSE Mathematics Linear (8300)

Students who require extra

support may be offered

OCR Entry Level Mathematics (R449)

Crown Hills Community College ICT and Computing Modes of Study

The ICT department has three dedicated rooms, each well equipped with PCs and an electronic white board for teaching purposes.

The college has a range of technology in each zone including Laptops, and iPads that can be hired out by each faculty.

Curriculum

Our vibrant and forward thinking ICT department teach the following modes of study to students in Key Stage 3:

Students in Years 7-9 have one discrete ICT lesson per week.

They are taught in mixed ability groups.

Schemes of work follow the National Curriculum and are constantly reviewed and updated to meet the ever changing needs of our students and governmental changes.

At the end of each unit students are assessed to reinforce their learning.

Students are encouraged to familiarise themselves with the level criteria for each unit in order to get the best possible grades.

In Year 9 students are taught towards a Functional Skills qualification and then examined at the appropriate time for their level.

Key Stage 3 students will be able to:

• Collaborate on projects

• Use skills that combine multiple software applications across a range of devices

• Collect and analyse data and information to meet the needs of a given target audience

• Create, reuse and repurpose digital information and content

• Understand and plan for copyright and intellectual property laws

• Use two programming languages

• Understand hardware and software components

• Explain network topologies

• Understand how to stay eSafe and advise others how to do the same

• Understand maths for computing – binary

• Use control systems to model systems i.e. traffic lights

Key Stage 4 students

All our students will have the opportunity to take qualifications in aspects of GCSE ICT or Computer Science, which lead to progression for higher levels of study at college, or within a professional career.

Students will develop their capability, creativity, and knowledge in digital media, information technology, and computer science, manage their online identity by staying eSafe and participate in online communities such as Office 365 and Sky Drive where they can collaborate on shared documents and projects.

They will develop and critically evaluate digital media, and take account of ethical, legal, social, and environmental consequences of information systems and their effects on society.

By studying computing sciences students will further develop and apply their analytic, problem-solving, design, and computational thinking skills, by learning to programme in a computing language such as HTML and Python.

They will study and learn to understand the principles of networked systems, and the analysis and design of those systems.

Exam boards and assessment.

Edexcel GCSE

Click here for Information about Edexel GCSE Qualification

This qualification is available as both a single and double award, and is as follows:

• The Single Award is two units.

• The Double Award is four units, two of which are the same as the single award.

• The Single Award has one exam paper worth 40% of the total marks, and one controlled assessment worth 60%.

• The Double Award has the same exam paper and controlled assessment task, and then a second exam paper and a second controlled assessment task.

• Single Award Unit 1 Living in a Digital World – In this unit, students explore how digital technology impacts on the lives of individuals, organisations and society.

• Single Award Unit 2 Using Digital Tools – This is a practical unit. Students broaden and enhance their ICT skills and capability.

• Double Award Unit 3 Digital Design – In this unit, students explore the design of interactive digital products such as websites, computer games and databases.

• Double Award Unit 4 Creating Digital Products – This is a practical unit. Students work with arrange of digital tools and techniques to produce effective ICT solutions in a range of contexts.

OCR Computing

Click here for Information about OCR GCSE Computing Qualification

This carefully planned course gives students a real in-depth understanding of how computer technology works.

It offers an insight into what goes on ‘behind the scenes’, including computer programming.

KS4 Students will learn to do the following:

• Develop their understanding of current and emerging technologies and how they work.

• Look at the use of algorithms in computer programs

• Become independent and discerning users of IT

• Acquire and apply creative and technical skills, knowledge and understanding of ICT in a range of contexts

• Develop computer programs to solve problems

• Evaluate the effectiveness of computer programs/solutions and impact of computer technology in society

Assessment:

Computer systems and programming.

This is assessed by a written paper, which has a mixture of short and long answer questions, some of which require students to write program code.

Practical Investigation.

This will be on a topic chosen from a set of options supplied by OCR (Controlled Assessment).

Programming project.

Students create solutions to computing tasks chosen from a set of options supplied by OCR (Controlled Assessment).

The faculty also offers lunchtime sessions to all KS4 students and after school revision when appropriate.

 

Key Stage 3

Students complete a 2 year Key Stage 3 course, studying topics across Biology, Chemistry and Physics

There are 10 major areas of study, each area contains 4 topics, making 40 topics in total.

These are studied across Years 7 and 8. The areas of study are:

1. Forces

2. Electricity and magnetism

3. Energy

4. Waves

5. Matter

6. Chemical Reactions

7. Earth and Space

8. The Human Reproductive System

9. Organisms

10. Ecosystems

11. Genes

Key Stage 4

Students study for their GCSE across Years 9, 10 and 11.

The Science GCSE is a double award and students receive 2 grades.

Students will take 6 exams at the end of the course; there is no controlled assessment.

Students study topics across Biology, Chemistry and Physics

Biology Chemistry Physics
1. Cell Biology 8. Atomic structure and the periodic table 18. Energy
2. Organisation 9. Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter 19. Electricity
3. Infection and response 10. Quantitative chemistry 20. Particle model of matter
4. Bioenergetics 11. Chemical changes 21. Atomic structure
5. Homeostasis and response 12. Energy changes 22. Forces
6. Inheritance, variation and evolution 13. The rate and extent of chemical change 23. Waves
7. Ecology 14. Organic chemistry 24. Magnetism and electromagnetism
15. Chemical analysis
16. Chemistry of the atmosphere
17. Using resources

Year 7

Tout sur moi

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to introduce themselves

to describe themselves and other people

to describe their favourite object

about French speaking regions

nouns and articles (le, la, l’, les, un, une, des)

the present tense of avoir

adjectives

in + countries (au, en)

memorisation strategies

ask and answer questions

pronunciation (silent letters at the end of words)

Mon monde perso

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to describe their personality

to talk about family members and friends

give opinions of school subjects

to compare themselves now and how they used to be

the present tenses of avoir and être

adjective agreement

possessive adjectives (mon, ma, mes)

comparaisons (plus, moins … que)

connectives

object pronouns (le, la, les)

reading strategies

memorisation strategies

using transferable language

pronunciation (last consonants as silent letters

Autour de moi

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about school

to talk about where they live

to talk about leisure activities

to describe animals

the present tenses of regular –er verbs and aller, faire, avoir, être

adjective agreement and position

the perfect tense

writing strategies

cognates and false friends

using a bilingual dictionary

pronunciation (accents)

A table

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to say what they eat and drink

to give opinions

to say where they like to eat

to order food at a café

to give quantities and understand recipes

to talk about food specialties

partitive articles (du, de la, de l’, des)

the present tense of manger and boire

negatives

verb + infinitive

memorisation strategies

writing strategies

pronunciation (silent letters at the end of words)

Mon quartier

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to describe a town

to say what you can do

to ask and give directions

to arrange to go out and to meet

il y a / il n’y a pas de

position of adjectives

prepositions

the imperative

modal verbs + infinitive

reading and listening strategies

pronunciation (silent h)

Ça c’est mon truc

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about clothes and styles

to talk about the weather

to discuss weekend activities

to talk about music preferences and national events

the present tense of –er verbs, reflexive verbs and faire

possessive adjectives (son, sa, ses)

memorisation strategies

listening strategies

pronunciation (having a good accent)

Destination vacances

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about usual and preferred holiday

to describe their ideal holiday

to describe a past holiday

to talk about festivals

the present tense of choisir, finir and prendre

the near future tense

verb + infinitive

in + country, city (en , au, aux, à)

the perfect tenses with avoir and of aller

speaking strategies

reading strategies

using a bilingual dictionary

time expressions

pronunciation (liaison after s)

Bouger c’est important

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about sports, leisure activities

to name parts of the body

to talk about sports injuries

to describe sports personalities and sports events

jouer and faire

depuis + present tense

the perfect tenses of aller

verbs + infinitive

j’ai mal au, à la, à l’, aux

checking written work

remembering grammar rules

pronunciation (vowels)

Aux quatre coins du monde

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about where they live and where they are going to live

to describe their daily routine

to talk about what they did yesterday

to discuss what they do to help others

about French speaking countries in Africa

comparisons (plus, moins)

the near future

reflexive verbs

the perfect tense with avoir and être

expressions with avoir (faim, soif, peur)

thinking strategies

speaking strategies

using transferable language

Year 8

C’est quoi la France?

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to compare France and the UK

to describe a country

to talk about French personalities

to talk about transport and new technology

to discuss Francophone cartoon characters

the present tense of –er verbs

use of on

comparatives and superlatives

ask questions

the perfect tense

use qui to link sentences

motivation strategies

agree and disagree

geographical knowledge

cultural awareness

pronunciation (intonation)

Le monde des medias

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about television programmes

to give opinion on musical genres

to talk about film and reviews

to talk about reading preferences

to understand the language of advertising

direct object pronouns

faire + infinitive

rendre + adjective

ce que

verb + infinitive

reading, listening and writing strategies

express and justify opinions

translation strategies

phonics

pronunciation (qu)

Accro à la technologie

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about technology and gadgets

to identify the risk of social networking sites

?discuss the pros and cons of new technologies

adjectives agreement and position

verb + preposition + infinitive

impersonal structures

à + definite article

speaking and reading strategies

memorisation strategies

spoken and written register

debate a point

pronunciation (eu)

Etre ado, c’ect quoi?

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to discuss relationships with parents

to talk about pocket money and helping at home

to discuss pressures faced by teenagers

to discuss life in the past

to describe the life of homeless children

pronouns (me, te, se)

modal verbs (devoir, pouvoir, devoir)

the imperative

the imperfect tenses

ask and answer questions

listening strategies

cultural awareness

pronunciation (silent verb ending, -ent)

En pleine forme

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to discuss healthy lifestyles

to talk about resolutions

to talk about what life in the future

impersonal structures

the pronoun en

the perfect tenses

expression of quantity

the future tense

dictionary skills

use context to work out meaning

evaluate one’s performance

check written work

translate into French

pronunciation (r)

Rendez-vous

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to organise a party

to suggest activities and make excuses

to talk about traditions, festivals or events

to communicate in formal situations

the near future tense

on pourrait + infinitive

the perfect tense with être

the imperfect tense

vous form

speaking strategies

evaluate one’s performance

conversation skills

cultural awareness

pronunciation (perfect and imperfect tense)

Autour du monde

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about travel plans

to compare means of transport

to buy tickets

to describe a past holiday

negatives

the present tense of –ir verbs

si, quand + tense

the perfect and imperfect tense

24 hour clock

memorisation strategies

translation skill

pronunciation (r, u, ou)

Chez moi, ça veut dire quoi?

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about types of homes

to describe rooms in a house

to describe a bedroom

to describe their ideal home

y

depuis + present tense

the present of –re verbs

prepositions

si clauses + imperfect and conditional

translation strategies

different writing styles

debate a point

memorisation strategies

pronunciation (i, y)

Un métier, un rêve !

What students will learn Key grammar structures Key learning strategies
to talk about jobs and qualities

to discuss ideal jobs and ambitions

to talk about part-time jobs

to talk about success and failure

masculine and feminine

imperfect tense and the conditional

si clauses

quand + different tenses

ask and answer questions

translation strategies

motivation strategies

pronunciation (tongue twisters)

At Y8 & Y9, students use Allez 1 and Allez 2 textbooks, by Oxford press.

Year 9

Theme Topic Grammar
Identity & culture Relationships with family and friends possessive adjectives

adjective agreement rules

reflexive verbs (se disputer/se fâcher/s’entendre)

comparatives (plus que/moins que)

adverbs of frequency

present tense (regular verbs, avoir and être)

direct object pronouns

Identity & culture Marriage/ partnership position of adjectives

use of qui, que, dont to enhance descriptions

en + present participle

revision of future tense & future tense

direct and indirect object pronouns

Local, national & global areas of interest Home, town, neighbourhood and region il y a, on a, c’est

prepositions

plural partitive article and de after negative

?voir + infinitive

expressions of quantity

irregular verbs aller/faire ceux qui + verb

s’intéresser à

enhancing descriptions using qui/que/dont

demonstrative adjectives ce, cet, cette, ces

Current & future study & employment My studies devoir, il faut + infinitive (compulsory subjects)

parce que/car to express reasons

perfect tense avoir verbs (choisir/décider de/laisser tomber – options)

two verbs together eg aimer/aimer mieux/préférer

comparative and superlative in opinions about subjects

use of tu and vous in informal/formal exchanges

Current & future study & employment Life at school/ college transfer devoir/pouvoir/il faut/vouloir to school rules

si clauses using imperfect and conditional

quantity words beaucoup/trop/assez/pas assez + de

perfect tense with (ce que j’ai fait comme devoirs)

Identity & culture Free-time Music Cinema & TV Eating out Sport present tense incl. irregular verbs sortir, prendre, mettre, voir, vouloir

extend range of two verbs together

future tense introduced for eg weekend plans

adverbs such as d’habitude/normalement

clauses introduced by quand/lorsque and si

Local, national & global areas of interest Social issues Healthy/ unhealthy living partitive articles with food items

recap on devoir/il faut and introduce conditional forms

il vaut mieux/il vaudrait mieux

negative ne…jamais

previous health habits using imperfect tense

Local, national & global areas of interest Charity/ voluntary work vouloir + infinitive

vouloir que + subjunctive

il est possible que + subjunctive

Year 10

Theme Topic Grammar
Identity & culture Customs and festivals in French-speaking countries perfect of verbs with être + agreement rules

reflexive verbs in perfect; perfect and imperfect tenses together

describing a past event/festival; actions and opinions

Local, national & global areas of interest Travel and tourism consolidation of perfect and imperfect tenses

sequencing words, expressions and phrases

avant de/après avoir etc/pendant que/depuis/venir de

developing greater complexity in spoken and written accounts of past events or experiencesweather expressions with faire

Current & future study & employment Education post-16 ce qui/ce que … c’est… sentence pattern

building on si clauses with present and future

more complex two verb structures

Current & future study & employment Career choices and ambitions enhanced statements of possibility including permettre de
Identity & culture Technology in everyday life

Social media

Mobile technology

revision of past tenses to recount how social media have been used; or life before technology

grâce à/sans/avec

enhanced statements of possibility including permettre de

il est possible que + subjunctive

Local, national & global areas of interest Global issues The environment modal verbs linked to behaviours (must do/can do/should do/could do etc)

past tense for effects of behaviours on environment

si sentences revised for outlining consequences of actions

pluperfect tense perspective

Local, national & global areas of interest Global issues Poverty/ homelessness si j’étais…

à la place de … with conditional completions

il faut + infinitive and il faut que + subjunctive

Year 11

Theme Topic Grammar Skills Strategies
Identity & culture Me, my family and friends the present tense

the perfect tense with avoir

the perfect tense with être

the imperfect tense

the pluperfect tense

the near future tense

the future tense

the conditional

modal verbs

reflexive verbs

common irregular verbs

adjectives (agreement and position)

extended sentences and subordinate clauses

direct and indirect object pronouns

verbs + infinitive

opinions

register (tu, vous)

Listening

Speaking

role-play

picture

description

Reading

Writing

message

structured

open-ended

Translation

from French

into French

pronunciation

learning vocabulary

ignoring unecessary words

near-cognates

memorising

coping

using a dicitonary

making use of social and cultural context

unprepared questions

false-friends

idioms

Identity & culture Technology in everyday life
Identity & culture Free time activites
Identity & culture Customs and festivals
Local, national & global areas of interest Home, town, neighbourhood and region
Local, national & global areas of interest Social issues
Local, national & global areas of interest Global issues
Local, national & global areas of interest Travel and tourism
Current & future study & employment My studies
Current & future study & employment Life at school and college
Current & future study & employment Education post-16
Current & future study & employment Jobs, career choices and ambitions

At KS4, students use the AQA GCSE textbooks, by Oxford press.

For further guidance please refer to the Edexcel website by clicking here.

 

Key Stage 3

At key stage 3 we offer 6 different materials based experiences:

Wood

Metal and plastic

Electronics

Textiles

Food technology

Graphics (Computer Aided design)

At crown Hills we offer one of the most varied and all encompassing DT curriculums of any inner city school.

While other schools are side lining technology and reducing the number of lessons or the range of experiences offered, Crown Hills is continuing to improve and develop its allocation for the subject.

STEM is the big buzz word at the moment both in industry and in schools.

Crown Hills has a STEM zone were maths, science and DT work together to prepare students for further studies and careers in this exciting and rapidly developing industry.

Our vision for Design Technology is the contextual application of maths and science linked with problem solving, creativity and practical skills that are at the core of the DT curriculum.

We are pushing this through our STEM projects which are planned and delivered by teaching “teams” involving staff from Maths, science and Design Technology.

Students begin Y7 in Design Technology with a 6 week key skills program to develop the core design skills needed for success in each material area (the program is currently being updated to include practical key skills and independent and enquiry learning skills).

They then rotate through 3 of the 6 material areas completing an extended design and manufacture project in each area (10 weeks in length).

Students now experience one shorter 7 week project so that they can take part in a STEM enquiry project.

This is then repeated in Y8 with anther more advanced key skills program plus projects in the 3 remaining areas and participation in another STEM project.

Pupils the complete 6 shorter 6 week projects in Y9.

These focus on key skills for GCSE coursework and in some cases producing material that could be included in a GCSE coursework project should the pupil opt to continue with DT at KS4.

One aim of the shorter rotations is to allow pupils to re visit all of the different material areas before they make their GCSE option choices for KS4

All projects follow the design process and complete a linear journey through:

Project brief

Research tasks

Developing a simple specification.

Creating a range of design ideas that follow the specification.

Evaluating the ideas with feedback from potential customers.

Developing and improving the idea.

Modeling the idea using light materials (where appropriate)

Producing a final version of the idea.

Final testing and evaluation.

Each of these areas involves developing and practicing key skills before producing the assessed piece of work.

KS4 GCSE courses

OCR Product Design

This is the generic course we use for students taking our Graphics, electronics and resistant material full course GCSE’s ( Current teachers: J. Hallett, S. Duis, P. Newbold, S. Henry and R. Hill)

OCR Food Technology (Current teacher: K. Muttock)

Click here for the OCR Web Site

AQA Textiles (Current teachers: S. Duis and M. Panting)

Click here for the AQA Web Site

KS4 Btec courses

Level 1 Construction (Current teacher: B. Parra)

Click here for the EDEXEL Web Site

In our GCSE courses we spend the first two terms of Y10 concentration on a design portfolio or folder for their coursework project.

Course work is worth 60% of the total GCSE grade and the portfolio is worth approximately half of this ( I.e 30% of total GCSE).

The first term will focus on activities such as:

Development of a brief or problem to solve through the project.

Product analysis based research focusing on similar products or solutions.

Customer or client based research using surveys and interviews.

Formulation of a product specification.

The second term will focus on activities such as:

Initial designs (sketching and annotation)

Evaluation.

Development of ideas leading to a final concept (often using C.A.D packages like Photoshop or Google sketch up).

The third term in Y10 and the first term and a half of Y11 will focus on practical skills and the manufacturing or modelling of a product in the workshop, followed by testing.

The final term and a half of Y11 will focus on revision for terminal exams.

OCR qualifications have 2 exam units AQA have one longer exam.

Our BTEC Construction course is based mainly on developing practical skills within certain areas of Construction.

There are 2 written units and 4 practical units.

All units have a booklet that must be completed and most have a practical activity to support it .

Although this course is not the equivalent of a GCSE it will offer a good basic grounding for anyone who is considering pursuing a career in Constuction and prefers practical based activities.

The main practical activities we will be doing are:

Carpentry and Joinery

Painting and decorating

Brickwork

Trowel operations

The Expressive Arts Faculty is divided into four different departments: Art, Dance, Drama & Music

At Key Stage 3 each student studies the four Expressive Arts subjects in rotation each year.

At Key Stage 4 students choose Expressive Arts subjects from a list of options that includes subjects from other faculties.

Each Expressive Arts Department offers extra-curricular activities and lessons at lunchtime and after school.

Each department also offers opportunities for students to perform or display their work and go on trips as part of the curriculum.

Art

Key Stage 3 – Students study the National Curriculum for Art learning to develop their creativity and ideas, and improve their artistic skills.

They also learn to understand the work of artists and designers throughout history and up to the present day. They learn to use a range of techniques and materials and understand how to evaluate their work.

Key Stage 4

Year 10 AQA GCSE Art & Design Syllabus 8201.

Year 11 AQA GCSE Art & Design Syllabus 4201.

Extra-curricular Art – Art Clubs are available at lunchtime and after school for Key Stage 3 & 4.

Dance

Key Stage 3 – Dance – Students create and devise their own choreographed work using skills and techniques taught in class alongside the promotion of physical education, health and body awareness.

Key Stage 4 – Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 in Performing Arts

Extra-curricular Dance includes Indian Garba and Bhangra.

Drama

Key Stage 3 – Students learn to improvise, rehearse and perform their own drama using role, intonation, tone, volume, mood, silence, stillness and action to add impact.

Students discover through the use of the drama medium elements of drama and explorative strategies.

Develop confidence, communication skills, creativity and self-esteem.

Key Stage 4

Year 11 Drama Edexcel GCSE Syllabus 2DR01.

Year 10 Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 in Performing Arts – Acting.

Music

Key Stage 3

Year 7 – Students learn the basics of Music Notation by learning simple tunes on the electronic keyboard and the use of music technology.They find out about the elements of Music.

Students learn ensemble and solo performance skills, about African rhythms and melodies and how to improvise.

Year 8 – Students learn about Indian Music Notation and how to compose their own Indian Music using a Raga.

They also learn a Bollywood melody and remix it to create their own version.

Year 9 – Students learn about Blues Music, and explore how Pop music developed from Blues through other styles and genres to what it is today.

They learn how this music is composed and put together using rhythms, chords, riffs and bass lines.

They also learn about how music is used by the media

Key Stage 4

Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Music

The Music Department offers an extensive extra-curricular timetable of instrumental lessons and ensemble groups.

Parents/Carers may find the following links helpful:

Leicester-Shire Music Education Hub

My Panyard

D-E-A Classes and Tuition

Please find below links to music from our Steel Bands

Merry Christmas

Footsteps

The Lion Sleeps Tonight

Soul Limbo

Just the way you are

Little Mermaid

Stand By Me

Yellow Submarine

All pupils at Crown Hills Community College have two lessons a week on Citizenship and PSHEE (Personal Health and Economic Education) in KS3.

Citizenship education is about enabling pupils to make their own decisions and to take responsibility for their own lives as well as taking in interest and participating in local, national and international issues.

We encourage students to understand their rights and responsibilities and become ‘model’, ‘good’ and ‘active’ citizens both in school and in their futures.

We encourage pupils to relate to real life events, controversial and topical issues that encourage and develop thinking, research and debating skills as well as numeracy and literacy skills.

Our PSHEE lessons develop self-confidence and strategies to deal with lifes challenges and explore opportunities of adult and working life.

Citizenship and PSHEE is about developing :

•Knowledge and understanding:

•Skills and aptitudes: Critical thinking, analysing information, expressing opinions, taking part in discussions, debates, negotiating, conflict resolution and participating in community action.

•Values and dispositions: Respect for justice, democracy and the rule of law, openness, tolerance, courage to defend a point of view and a willingness to listen to, work with and stand up for others.

Citizenship and PSHEE is important because it addresses real issues, relating to social justice, human rights, community cohesion and developing students SMSC awareness (Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural) both now and in the future.

The Life Skills KS3 Curriculum at a glance

Year 7 Year 8 Year 9
Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, rights & responsibilities, the work of the school council, having your say and democracy. Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, rights & responsibilities, the Law, ASBO’s, young offenders, gangs, mock trial, sentencing and the youth offending team. Citizenship 1 = Rules, fairness, responsibilities, justice, Human Rights, police rights, surveillance, terrorism, freedom of information and equality.
Citizenship 2 = Communities and identities, being good and active citizens, changing our community and bringing communities together. Citizenship 2 = Local communities and local government involves understanding local issues, the work of the council, stereotyping, racism, sexism, discrimination and the law. Citizenship 2 = National Government and National Politics, political parties, various voting systems, role of MP’s, Houses of Parliament, law making, pressure groups, UK Government and the monarchy.
Citizenship 3 = Being a global citizen, understanding child labour, Fair trade, charity and volunteering. Citizenship 3 = Human rights in a global community, refugees, migration, media and the free press. Citizenship 3 = Britain and the world: Europe, the Commonwealth, United Nations, Northern Ireland and South Africa.
PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships. (Including anti-bullying week). Dealing with homework, family issues, domestic violence etc. PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships looks at self-esteem, shyness, leisure time, beating boredom, divided families, domestic violence, friendship, culture, lifestyle and influences. We also investigate stereotypes. PSHEE 1 = Understanding yourself and relationships looks at becoming an adult, dealing with loss and bereavement, assertive behaviour, mental illness and racism.
PSHEE 2 = You and your money, looks at money management and being a consumer. PSHEE 2 = You and your money investigates financial risks and gambling awareness. PSHEE 2 = You and your money looks at banking, savings and being a green consumer.
PSHEE 3 = You and work, looks at skills, qualities, qualifications, doing market research, designing, marketing and presenting a product as a group. PSHEE 3 = You and work looks at the organisation of firms, employment and unemployment, different industries, finance, risk and profit. PSHEE 3 = You and work looks at decision making, knowing our strengths, skills and qualities.(including the Options module) and undertaking careers research.
PSHEE 4 = You and your body: looks at puberty and the awareness of drugs and smoking. PSHEE 4 = Keeping healthy looks at the risk and awareness of alcohol and drugs, physical safety at home and in the streets PSHEE 4 =You and your body looks at adolescence, eating disorders, drugs awareness, positive body image, physical safety, relationships and STI’s

In KS4, (year 10 and 11) pupils undertake a GCSE in Humanities (AQA Board), this integrates religious studies, history, geography and Life Skills.

Students look at four key areas, they are examined on this and the exam is worth 75% of their final grade.

In addition, pupils work independently to complete a 2,000 word essay in controlled conditions with support from their Life Skills teacher.

This is worth 25% of the final grade.

Pupils are provided with a source booklet prior to the exam to work from, annotate and prepare for prior to the exam.

Culture and Core Beliefs

• Understanding common and contrasting cultures

• Understanding simple and complex cultures

• Understanding subculture, agents of socialisation, identity and IQ

• Understanding the nature V nurture debate

• Understanding laws, morals values, beliefs and rituals

• Understanding migration and multiculturalism

• Investigating social, moral, political or religious issues (capital punishment, euthanasia, medical ethics, the monarchy etc)

Conflict and Cooperation

• Understanding causes and effects of conflict.

• Understanding Human Rights, freedoms and responsibilities.

• Conflict at a local level (bullying)

• Conflict at a national level (apartheid and South Africa)

• Conflict at an international level (Rwanda)

• Students have the opportunity to select other conflicts i.e. Syria, Palestine, Afghanistan, Iraq as case studies etc.

Environment

• Environmental problems (pollution, global warming, habitats, climate change, exploitation, tourism etc.)

• Understanding renewable and non-renewable resources

• Looking at the energy crises

• Individual and group responses to the environment, the work of political groups, pressure groups and business

• Solutions to environmental problems

• Investigating case studies: Tropical rainforests, deforestation, coral reefs etc.

• Investigating sustainable solutions

• Investigating National Parks

People and work

• Understanding the relevance of work in different cultures

• Motivations for work

• Understanding leisure and work satisfaction

• Understanding the impact of unemployment

• Understanding the impact of technology

• Understanding the three main employment sectors

• Explaining globalisation and multinational companies and the change in working patterns

• Looking at economic migration

• Investigating case studies involving conflict in the workplace, equality legislation and the role of trade unions

In 2016, the faculty has also started delivering Citizenship GCSE at KS4

This is 100% exam based and includes the following topics

RIGHTS, THE LAW AND THE LEGAL SYSTEM IN ENGLAND AND WALES DEMOCRACY AND GOVERNMENT THE UK AND THE WIDER WORLD
Rights and responsibilities Democracy, elections and voting in the UK Identities and diveristy in the UK society
The law National, local, regional and devolved government The UK and its relations with the wider world.
The legal system The British Constitution
The economy, finance and money
The role of the media and free press
Citizenship participation and action
Politics beyond the UK

Please encourage your child to use sophisticated vocubulary, watch/read the news and develop an opinion on what is going on locally, nationall and internationally.

Try to discuss current affairs with them and encourage them to attend the numerous revision sessions that the school offers during lunchtimes and after school.

Revision booklets are provided closer to the exams.

In addition we teach a one off Life Skills lesson which prepares students for the wider world.

Students look at:

Financial Management Work SRE British Values
Consumer/Banking/ Debt/ Financial Management Economic Enterprise/understanding payslips/insurance CV’s, letters of application, UCAS, personal statements, charity work and volunteering Teenage Parent Contraception lesson SR awareness Forced marriage Mental Health Eating disorders Homophobia Legal Highs/Shisha Smoking SEN/Drug Awareness Diabetic awareness Cancer awareness Radicalisation Gang Culture Knife Crime Anti-Social Behavior

HISTORY CURRICULUM

Year 7

Autumn – Spring Term

Crown Vs the people – A study looking at the actions of different monarchs and key characters in history between 1066 and 1400 and considering how these have shaped Britain including people such as William the Conqueror, Simon de Montfort, Henry II, Thomas Becket. We also look at what life was like in this time considering issues such as the Black Death.

Spring – Summer Term

Turbulent Tudors- An in depth look at the different Tudor monarchs and how they helped to shape Britain. We consider the changes to religion they brought as well as moving on to look at the Stuarts.

Year 8

Autumn term

Empire to equality – An outline study considering the Slave trade and its abolition, as well as life for Black Americans in 20th Century America.

Spring term

The Industrial Revolution – A depth study considering the changes in Britain between 1750 and 1850 including the rise of factories and the working conditions for child labourers.

Summer term

Conflict in the twentieth century- A thematic study looking at how conflict has evolved and developed over the last 100 years considering events such as WW1, WW2, the dropping of the atomic bomb, the Vietnam was as well as modern day terrorism.

Year 9

Autumn – Spring Term

America 1910-1929- Starting the GCSE syllabus this module looks at developments in America such as the intolerance faced by immigrants, political factions and black Americans. We also look at the economic issues surrounding the economic boom of the 1920s leading to eventual Wall Street Crash in 1929. We finish the topic looking at the social side of the 1920s looking at what people did for fun and attitudes to women and how these developed over the period.

Spring – Summer Term

The development of Germany 1919-1991- our second GCSE module looks at the development of Germany from 1919 with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles through Hitler’s reign all the way through the cold war culminating in the tearing down of the Berlin wall in 1989 and the aftermath and impact on Germany.

Year 10- Eduqas specification

Autumn Term

The Elizabethan Age, 1558-1603- We look at how Elizabeth gained control over the country, the issues she had with religion and foreign powers alongside how her reign impacted upon normal people in society.

Spring Term

Changes in Health and Medicine in Britain, c.500 to the present day- We look thematically at key figures and influences in the changing of medicine.

Year 11

Recap of the year 9 and 10 modules with focussed revision.

RELIGIOUS STUDIES CURRICULUM

Year 7

Autumn Term

Introduction to Religious studies, Philosophy and Ethics – A study of the identity of God across religions

Creation Theory and Identity of God – A study of views of creation with a philosophical look to scientific and religious creation theory.

Spring Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Festivals

Summer Term – No RS as Humanities rotations

Year 8

Autumn – Spring Term

Holy books and Moral codes – A study into holy books and moral codes with an investigation into medical ethics

Spring – Summer Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Year 9 Autumn – Spring Term

Founders and Pilgrimage – A study of founders, key figures and pilgrimage within religion

Spring – Summer Term

Worship Beliefs and Practices – A study of beliefs and practices of religious groups

Year 10 – WJEC Eduqas GCSE in Religious Studies

Autumn Term

COMPONENT 2 – Christian Beliefs and Teachings

COMPNENT 3 – Hindu Beliefs & Teaching

Spring Term

COMPONENT 1 – Issues of Relationships

COMPONENT 1 – Issues of life and death

Summer Term

COMPONENT 2 – Christianity Practices

Year 11 – OCR B Religion Philosophy and Applied Ethics

Autumn Term

Philosophy 2 – Good and evil

Ethics 2 – Religion, Peace and justice

Spring Term

Philosophy 2 – Religion and Science

Ethics 2 – Religion and the Media

Summer Term

Revision

GEOGRAPHY CURRICULUM

Year 7

Pupils are taught on a rotation so will either study Geography or History for the first half term and then swap in the second half term.

Autumn – Spring Term

An Introduction to Geography incorporating geographical skills e.g. map work

Settlement

Spring – Summer Term

Weather and climate

Ecosystems

Year 8

Autumn – Spring Term

Coasts

Population

Spring – Summer Term>

Development

Rivers

Year 9

3 Units taught in rotation to all teaching groups:

Population

Coasts

Start the OCR A GCSE Course

Year 10

OCR GCSE Geography Specification A

Autumn Term

Ecosystems

Environmental threats

Spring Term

People and the planet

Field work and geographical skills

Summer Term

People of the UK

Year 10

OCR A Specification- Geographical Themes.

The course is comprised of 3 units

1 content exams: Living in the UK today and the World Around us

1 field work skills exam

Autumn Term

Ecosystems

Environmental threats

Spring- Summer Term

People and the planet

Field work

Year 11

OCR GCSE Geography Specification B (J385)

The course is comprised of 3 units

B561 Sustainable Decision Making Exercise (SDME) = 25%

B562 Controlled Assessment Coursework (The Fieldwork Focus) = 25%

B563 Geographical Themes – the Terminal exam 50% based on themes 1 (rivers & coasts), 2 (population & settlement) and 4 (economic development)

Units B561 & B563 have tiered entry, either Foundation or Higher

Autumn Term

Controlled Assessment- The Fieldwork Focus.

Theme 4 Economic Development

Spring and Summer Term

Theme 3 Population to prepare for the SDME exam on May 13.

Revision of Themes 1 & 2 for terminal exam on May 22.

 

KS 3 and KS 4 PE

The best way of supporting your child will be to encourage them to increase fitness levels and be able to swim at least 25meters.

Encourage them by working with them on fitness activities at home whether this is spending 30mins jogging, cycling, swimming etc.

Activities that will make them out of breath.

Aim to do this 3-5 times a week

Below is a link for Spence street leisure centre showing pool times and possible swimming classes to help your child achieve the 25m goal.

Spence Street Leisure Centre

Potential fitness circuits you could do at home could be searched from the following web link

Home Exercise and Fitness

If your child shows an interest in a sport then take them to a local club to try it out. Use the following link to search the sport of interest.

BBC Get Inspired

Throughout their time in school pupils will be looking to develop Fitness and will be involved in a variety of sports.

These will be done on rotational method.

Sports they might experience Football, Netball, Badminton, Basketball, Cricket, Rounders, Gymnastics, Athletics, Volleyball, Fitness, Table Tennis

Encourage your child to participate in extracurricular activities either inside or outside of school.

KS4 BTEC Sport

If your child chooses Btec Sport as an option then the following link will give more information.

Edexel Web Site

Pupils will complete 4 units.

2 core units. Unit 1 Fitness for sport and Exercise (Will be an online exam).

Unit 2 Practical Sports performance

2 optional units. Unit 4 The sports performer in Action.

Unit 6 Leading Sports Activities.

In Leicester City there are 288 children who have a hearing impairment.

Some hearing losses are greater than others; therefore individual students will require different levels of support.

The majority of students attend their local main stream schools and are support by a Peripatetic Teacher of the Deaf within that setting.

However, there are students who, for a variety of reasons, need more intensive support.

These students are placed here at Crown Hills Community College where there is a unit designed to support Deaf students both academically and socially.

Every day they have access to Teachers of the Deaf and support staff that are specifically trained to teach and support them.

The teacher of the Deaf deliver language based subjects in the unit.

These include English, Humanities and Life Skills.

The rest of the curriculum is delivered in the mainstream setting with support from the specialist staff.

Tutorials are also a big part of the unit support.

During these sessions the students are given time to consolidate subject specific language on a one to one basis.

The unit setting also allows the students to develop their language and communication skills, both of which will be significantly delayed.

Over the years, the number of students who have attended the unit has fluctuated between twelve and one.

At the present time we have four students in the unit: two year 11 and two year 9.

There are a further four students who are taught in the mainstream of the school with support from a Teacher of the Deaf (on a regular basis but not in the unit)

The new facilities in the unit are superb.

The sound proof rooms mean that the students are getting the best possible access to the curriculum.

Hearing tests and equipment checks can be carried out with confidence, knowing that the outcome will be accurate.

Students
Parents